Burning Book: A Visual History of Burning Man

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Simon and Schuster, Aug 7, 2007 - Art - 350 pages
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It all began in 1986 when a pair of friends burned an eight-foot-tall effigy on Baker Beach in San Francisco in front of an impromptu audience of twenty. Two decades later Burning Man has evolved intoa dazzling annual extravaganza dedicated to radical self-reliance and radical self-expression, attracting nearly forty thousand people. These revelers -- an eclectic mix of punks, geeks, families, ravers, grad students, gearheads, hippies, and tourists -- turn the ancient lakebed of Nevada's Black Rock Desert into a bustling city that exists for one glorious week before disappearing in a cloud of ashes and dust.

Burning Book is both a loving commemoration of the event's storied history and an enlightening companion for festivalgoers. Bruder explores the unique ethos and breathtaking art installations that have shaped the event, along with Black Rock City's distinctive landmarks, pranks, lore, and gift-based economy. Illustrated with more than three hundred stunning photographs, Burning Book is a striking tribute to an extraordinary cultural phenomenon for the legions who participate in Burning Man every year, and for those who haven't become part of this unforgettable celebration -- yet.

 

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User Review  - klg - LibraryThing

Good account of this festival (I think: I've never been there "yet"). Great photos of the art installations Read full review

Contents

LAST CHANCE CITY
1
THE ROAD 02
17
THE FIRST MAN 03
37
THE DESERT WANTS TO KILL YOU 04
67
WORKING FOR THE MAN 05
111
DONT ROAST YOUR FRIENDS 06
141
DANGER DAYS 07
161
LIVING LARGE 08
183
CAPTAIN REVERSE
230
IM WITH THE BAND
241
TRADING FACES
255
THE VOYAGE OF LA CONTE
275
LETTING GO
299
LEAVE NO TRACE
319
AFTERGLOW
337
Copyright

DR MEGAVOLT
209

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About the author (2007)

Jessica Bruder is a reporter for the Oregonian. Her writing has also appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the New York Observer. She lives in Portland, Oregon.

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