Burying the Bones: Pearl Buck in China

Front Cover
Profile, 2010 - Americans - 340 pages
9 Reviews
Pearl Buck was raised in China by her American parents, Presbyterian missionaries from Virginia. Blonde and blue-eyed she looked startlingly foreign, but felt as at home as her Chinese companions. She ran free on the grave-littered grasslands behind her house, often stumbling across the tiny bones of baby girls who had been suffocated at birth. Buck's father was a terrifying figure, with a maniacal zeal for religious conversion - a passion rarely shared by the local communities he targeted. He drained the family's budget for his Chinese translation of the New Testament, while his aggrieved, long-suffering wife did her utmost to create a homely environment for her children, several of whom died tragically young.Pearl Buck would eventually rise to eminence in America as a bestselling author (her most renowned work, The Good Earth, re-entered the bestseller charts in 2004 when it was selected for Oprah's Book Club) but in this startlingly original biography, Spurling recounts with elegance and great insight her unspeakable upbringing in a China that was virtually unknown to the West.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
6
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - GalenWiley - LibraryThing

One of the twentieth century’s most extraordinary Americans, Pearl Buck was the first person to make China accessible to the West. She recreated the lives of ordinary Chinese people in The Good Earth ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bfertig - LibraryThing

Really focuses on the events in her life that popped up in the themes and characters of her writing - The Good Earth Trilogy and to a lesser extent her other works. The tragedy, lonliness/bad marriage ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (2010)

Hilary Spurling is the author of the universally acclaimed biography of Henri Matisse which was the Whitbread Book of the Year in 2005. Her biography of Ivy Compton-Burnett won the Heinemann and Duff Cooper prizes. She has also written biographies of Paul Scott and La Grande Th r se (Profile). She has been an arts critic for the Spectator, Observer and Telegraph, and lives in London.

Bibliographic information