Bush

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Jul 5, 2016 - Biography & Autobiography - 832 pages
Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of the Year

Distinguished presidential biographer Jean Edward Smith offers a “comprehensive and compelling” (The New York Times) life of George W. Bush, showing how he ignored his advisors to make key decisions himself—most disastrously in invading Iraq—and how these decisions were often driven by the President’s deep religious faith.

George W. Bush, the forty-third president of the United States, almost singlehandedly decided to invade Iraq. It was possibly the worst foreign-policy decision ever made by a president. The consequences dominated the Bush Administration and still haunt us today.

In Bush, a “well-rounded portrait…necessary and valuable in this election year” (Christian Science Monitor), Jean Edward Smith demonstrates that it was not Dick Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld, or Condoleezza Rice, but President Bush himself who took personal control of foreign policy. Bush drew on his deep religious conviction that important foreign-policy decisions were simply a matter of good versus evil. Domestically, he overreacted to 9/11 and endangered Americans’ civil liberties. Smith explains that it wasn’t until the financial crisis of 2008 that Bush finally accepted expert advice. As a result, he authorized decisions that saved the economy from possible collapse, even though some of those decisions violated Bush’s own political philosophy.

“An excellent initial assessment of a presidency that began in controversy…and ended with the international and domestic failures that saddled Bush with the most sustained negative ratings of any modern president” (Dallas Morning News), this comprehensive evaluation will surely surprise many readers. “Written in sober, smooth, snark-free prose, with an air of thoughtful, detached authority, the book is nonetheless exceedingly damning in its judgments about George W. Bush’s years in office” (The Washington Post).
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - msaucier818 - LibraryThing

I enjoyed reading back through a time period I remember well. I enjoyed this in-depth look at George Bush's Presidency. I think Smith was fair in that he highlighted the positives of the Bush (work ... Read full review

Bush

User Review  - Book Verdict

Pulitzer Prize finalist Smith (Eisenhower in War and Peace) treads boldly into an assessment of the ambitious and controversial presidency of George W. Bush (b. 1946) with this highly interpretive ... Read full review

Contents

one The Wilderness Years 1
1
two Turnaround
28
three Dont Mess with Texas
54
four Governor
80
five The 2000 Election
99
six The Rule of Law
123
seven Inauguration
148
eight March of the Hegelians
175
fourteen Invasion
326
fifteen Mission Accomplished
356
sixteen Four More Years
381
seventeen Katrina
416
eighteen Perils of a Second Term
444
nineteen The Mess in Mesopotamia
472
twenty Rummy Walks the Plank
499
twentyone Bush Takes Command
524

nine Asleep at the Switch
204
ten Toppling the Taliban
228
eleven LÉtat cest moi
253
twelve The Torture Trail
279
The Prelude
300
twentytwo AIDS
549
twentythree Quagmire of the Vanities
576
twentyfour Financial Armageddon
606
twentyfive Finis
633
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2016)

Jean Edward Smith taught at the University of Toronto for thirty-five years, and at Marshall University for twelve. He was also a visiting scholar at Columbia, Princeton, and Georgetown. He is the author of Bush, a biography of the 43rd president; Eisenhower in War and Peace; FDR, winner of the 2008 Francis Parkman Prize of the Society of American Historians; Grant, a 2002 Pulitzer Prize finalist; and John Marshall: Definer of a Nation.

Bibliographic information