Business Continuity and HIPAA: Business Continuity Management in the Health Care Environment

Front Cover
Rothstein Associates Inc, May 1, 2004 - Business planning - 230 pages
0 Reviews
This book will examine business continuity planning as adapted to encompass the requirements of The Health Care Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, or HIPAA. We will examine the typical business continuity planning model and highlight how the special requirements of HIPAA have shifted the emphasis. The layout of this book was designed to afford assistance, hints, and templates to the person or team charged with the task of implementing business continuity planning into a healthcare organization.You will notice that this book does not address Emergency Management (building evacuations and other immediate response procedures), which is outside the scope of the HIPAA regulations.Upon reading and re-reading the HIPAA regulations and the ?Comments and Responses? in the federal register, it becomes quite evident that the ?Contingency Plan? (read Business Continuity Plan) requirements were written by those looking to protect health information data. That being said, many of the examples that I use in this book relate to information technology and disaster recovery (recovery of computer capabilities). What is also important, and that I try to emphasize throughout the book, is that recovering the computer systems of a health care organization will not necessarily get it operational again after a disaster; a multitude of other production and operational components must be present in order to deliver services and products to customers/patients. Where appropriate, I have identified procedures and strategies that are unique to healthcare provider organizations. If not so indicated, it can be assumed that I am referring to healthcare organizations in general.The audience for whom I have designed this book are the people who are responsible for implementing a business continuity plan in a healthcare organization that comes under the scope of the HIPAA regulations. At first reading, the book may appear to be an exact template to be used to design a business continuity plan. What I hope that you will get out of the book (perhaps on a reread once you are into the planning project) is that this is a pencil outline on a canvas and that your insights and knowledge of your healthcare organization will add the color that will make it a masterpiece.What you will notice in this book is that we present an approach that is similar to traditional business continuity planning. This is done purposefully. The basic business continuity planning model looks to protect and/or recover all critical components of production. This model assumes an industry-specific nature not by changing the model itself, but by placing greater emphasis on the protection and recovery of those production resources that characterize that industry. In our view, ?thinking outside the box? is only required if the box was ill-conceived in the first place. Accordingly, this book can also be appropriate for many non-healthcare organizations.This book will include the special precautions and procedures that address the unique concerns of HIPAA, but it will present them along with the other business components in order to emphasis the need to take a holistic approach when constructing and maintaining a business continuity plan.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

VII
1
VIII
13
IX
14
XIII
15
XV
16
XVII
22
XVIII
24
XIX
35
XLVII
73
XLVIII
78
L
79
LI
80
LII
133
LIV
134
LV
135
LVI
136

XX
38
XXII
46
XXV
47
XXVI
48
XXX
49
XXXI
50
XXXII
58
XXXIII
59
XXXIV
62
XXXV
63
XL
64
XLIII
67
LVII
155
LVIII
163
LIX
182
LX
187
LXI
192
LXII
201
LXIII
223
LXIV
225
LXV
226
LXVI
228
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

JIM BARNES received an early introduction to check-listed emergency operating procedures as a commander of an ICBM launch crew in the Air Force¿s Strategic Air Command. While in the Air Force, Jim received a Master¿s degree in Economics which led him into being a bank economist when he left the service. This economics and financial background have forged a view of business continuity planning that is more business than technically oriented. Jim has over 15 years of extensive experience in Business Continuity Planning. He was in charge of designing Business Continuity Planning software which was marketed and used internationally. Most recently, Jim assisted in the design of a Business Continuity Certification course which he taught to ¿Big Four¿ consultants in Europe, South America, and the United States. Jim has written over 300 Business Continuity Plans most of which were for Health Services ¿Payer¿ institutions and for Financial Institutions. Jim has completed and has published, ¿A Guide to Business Continuity Planning¿, ¿E-Commerce Security¿Business Continuity Planning: A Technical Reference Guide¿, and has written ¿The Linchpin to Successful Business Continuity Planning¿ in the Fall, 2003 Disaster Recovery Journal. Jim is the founder and CEO of Barnes Continuity Planners, Inc. (BCP, Inc), a consulting firm that assists client companies with in business continuity planning. BCP, Inc. specializes in creating recovery plans, recovery strategies, and institutionalizing continuity management within an organization¿s culture. Jim is a Certified Recovery Planner and a Member of Business Continuity Institute.

Bibliographic information