Business Process Management: Concepts, Languages, Architectures

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Springer Science & Business Media, Nov 1, 2007 - Business & Economics - 368 pages
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Business process management is usually treated from two different perspectives: business administration and computer science. While business administration professionals tend to consider information technology as a subordinate aspect for experts to handle, by contrast computer scientists often consider business goals and organizational regulations as terms that do not deserve much thought but require the appropriate level of abstraction. Mathias Weske argues that the communities involved need to share a common understanding of the principles underlying business process management. To this end, he develops an overall picture that describes core BPM concepts and technologies and explains their relationships. This picture covers high-level business aspects like business goals, strategies, and value chains, but it concentrates on process modeling techniques and process enactment platforms, taking into account the different stakeholders involved. After starting with a presentation of general foundations, process orchestrations and process choreographies are covered. Based on control flow patterns, concrete process languages are introduced in a concise manner, including Workflow nets, Event-driven Process Chains, Yet Another Workflow Language, and the Business Process Modeling Notation. The various stages during the design and implementation of process choreographies are discussed. Different soundness properties are investigated in a chapter on formal aspects of business processes. Finally, he investigates concrete architectures to enact business processes, including workflow management architectures, case handling architectures and service-oriented architectures. He also shows how standards like SOAP, WSDL, and BPEL fit into the picture. This textbook is ideally suited for classes on business process management, information systems architecture, and workflow management. It is also valuable for project managers and IT professionals working in business process management, since it provides a vendor-independent view on the topic. The accompanying website www.bpm-book.com contains further information, such as links to references that are available online, exercises that offer the reader a deeper involvement with the topics addressed, and additional teaching material.
 

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Granskad bara som e-bok tyvärr. Noggrann och lite torr genomgång av processutveckling. Grundläggande i början, givet att man har en grund att stå på när det gäller processer och verksamheter. Tar upp flera olika ansatser och notationer för BPM, med särskitt gott öga till Petri Net. Blir allt mer komplicerad och kräver kunskaper i formella språk och mängdlogik. Finns mycket intressant i boken, men den är för komplicerad för systemvetenskap. 

Contents

Introduction
3
11 Motivation and Definitions
4
12 Business Process Lifecycle
11
13 Classification of Business Processes
17
14 Goals Structure and Organization
21
Evolution of Enterprise Systems Architectures
25
21 Traditional Application Development
26
22 Enterprise Applications and their Integration
28
Process Choreographies
227
51 Motivation and Terminology
228
52 Development Phases
231
53 Process Choreography Design
233
54 Process Choreography Implementation
245
55 Service Interaction Patterns
248
56 Lets Dance
258
Bibliographical Notes
266

23 Enterprise Modelling and Process Orientation
39
24 Workflow Management
49
25 Enterprise Services Computing
57
26 Summary
65
Bibliographical Notes
67
Business Process Modelling
70
Business Process Modelling Foundation
73
32 Abstraction Concepts
75
33 From Business Functions to Business Processes
78
34 Activity Models and Activity Instances
82
35 Process Models and Process Instances
88
36 Process Interactions
96
37 Modelling Process Data
98
38 Modelling Organization
102
39 Modelling Operation
107
310 Business Process Flexibility
111
311 Architecture of Process Execution Environments
120
Bibliographical Notes
124
Process Orchestrations
125
41 Control Flow Patterns
126
42 Petri Nets
149
43 Eventdriven Process Chains
158
44 Workflow Nets
169
45 Yet Another Workflow Language
182
46 GraphBased Workflow Language
200
47 Business Process Modeling Notation
205
Bibliographical Notes
225
Properties of Business Processes
267
61 Data Dependencies
268
62 Structural Soundness
270
63 Soundness
271
64 Relaxed Soundness
279
65 Weak Soundness
285
66 Lazy Soundness
290
67 Soundness Criteria Overview
299
Bibliographical Notes
301
Architectures and Methodologies
302
Business Process Management Architectures
305
72 Flexible Workflow Management
310
73 Web Services and their Composition
315
74 Advanced Service Composition
324
Case Handling
333
Bibliographical Notes
342
Business Process Methodology
344
82 Strategy and Organization
348
83 Survey
350
84 Design Phase
351
85 Platform Selection
352
86 Implementation and Testing
354
87 Operation and Controlling Phase
355
References
357
Index
365
Copyright

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 5 - A process is thus a specific ordering of work activities across time and place, with a beginning, an end, and clearly identified inputs and outputs: a structure for action.
Page 5 - Short (1990) define business process as "a set of logically related tasks performed to achieve a defined business outcome.
Page 4 - They define a business process as a collection of activities that take one or more kinds of input and create an output that is of value to the customer.

References to this book

About the author (2007)

Mathias Weske is Professor of Software Systems Technology at the Hasso Plattner Institute for Software Systems Engineering at the University of Potsdam, Germany, where he leads the business process technology research group. His current research interests include various topics in workflow management, web services technology, and enterprise application integration. He is a member of the GI, vice chair of the executive committee of GI SIG EMISA, and a member of IEEE and ACM.

Bibliographic information