Business systems in East Asia: firms, markets, and societies

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Sage, 1992 - Business & Economics - 280 pages
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In this major contribution to comparative-international business Richard Whitley compares and contrasts the dominant characteristics of firms and markets in Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and Hong Kong, relating these to their particular social, political and economic contexts.At the level of the firm he looks at such areas as management styles and structures, decision-making processes, owner-employee relations, and patterns of company growth and development. He also discusses market development, customer, supplier and inter-firm relations, and the roles of the financial sectors and the state in market and industry development.The book also examines the ways in which key social institutions in each country have affected the evolution of business. Finally, the author makes a comparison of East Asian business systems with dominant Western practices.

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Contents

East Asian Business Systems
22
Differences between East Asian Business Systems
64
Institutional Influences on East Asian Business Systems
85
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About the author (1992)

Richard Whitley is Professor of Organisational Sociology at Manchester Business School, University of Manchester and has recently held visiting appointments at Erasmus University Rotterdam, and Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo. Recent books include: Changing Capitalisms? Internationalisation,
Institutional Change and Systems of Economic Organisation; The Multinational Firm: Organizing Across Institutional and National Divides; Divergent Capitalisms: The Social Structuring and Change of Business Systems; and the second edition of The Intellectual and Social Organisation of the Sciences
(all published by Oxford University Press), and Competing Capitalisms (Edward Elgar). Current research interests include the institutional structuring of innovation patterns, changing institutional regimes and business systems, and competence development.