But this is My Mother!: The Plight of Our Elders in American Nursing Homes

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Publisher:VanderWyk&Burnham, 2000 - Social Science - 248 pages
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The author provides a first-hand account of the story of quiet desperation that is the day-to-day norm in the majority of nursing homes. Her mother spent the last years of her life as a total-care resident in an average-rated nursing home. She was not beaten, neglected, or otherwise abused -- at least not in the sense that would cause headlines to erupt -- yet the indignities and careless behaviours documented here are bone-chilling. Loucks's story is not significant because it is unique; it is significant because it is typical. Anecdotes of personal and professional experiences are woven with information about the nursing home business in general. Loucks offers helpful advice throughout the book to anyone who is feeling cornered by the system.
 

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But this is my mother!: the plight of our elders in American nursing homes

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Almost a quarter of America's nursing home residents receive substandard care, according to government reports, despite numerous state and federal regulations created to protect the nation's most ... Read full review

Contents

Its Pretty Bad
1
From Now On
9
The Long and Winding Road
27
No Turning Back
41
Reweaving Old Threads
53
No Glory
65
Total Care
81
Missed Opportunities and Moments Seized
97
On a Wing and a Prayer
157
Fractured Care
169
Slipping Away
183
The Full Moon Sets
195
Pushing Pulling and Just Standing Still
209
Hope Rising
219
Selecting a Nursing Home for Your Loved One
237
Working with a Family Council
240

To Eat or Not to Eat
107
Finding Our Way
117
Just Call Me Sisyphus
129
There IS Somebody Home
143
Bibliography
242
Resources
245
Index
247
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About the author (2000)

Loucks is a licensed psychotherapist who has worked in the mental health field for almost twenty years. Presently, in addition to her work as a writer, she serves as a hospice bereavement coordinator in northern Arizona.

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