C++ Programmer's Notebook

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Prentice Hall PTR, 2002 - Computers - 508 pages
C++ Programmer's Notebook, Second Edition teaches C++ the way real programmers want to learn it: "Show me the code and help me figure out the rest!" Completely updated with over 200 new examples, it covers all the C++ concepts and techniques programmers need to understand. It's an excellent starting point for new C++ developers, and an equally valuable reference for experienced C++ developers who want to reinforce their knowledge. Hands-on coverage includes: variables, operators, expressions, structures, functions, arrays, program control, objects, classes, overloading, inheritance, pointers, virtual functions, keyboard I/O, files and streams, memory management, sorting and searching data, data structures, and templates. The book also contains new coverage of string classes and exception handling, as well as programmer's checklists for writing efficient, reliable code.

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Contents

Working with Operators and Expressions
37
Working with Arrays and CStyle Strings
65
iii
111
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

JIM KEOGH is former chair of the E-Commerce Track at Columbia University, where he also teaches C++. He has developed advanced C++ computer systems for major Wall Street companies. He is author of several titles in Prentice Hall PTR's Programmer's Notebook Series, including the Windows Programming Programmer's Notebook. He is also on the graduate school faculty at Saint Peter's College in Jersey City, NJ.

JOHN SHAPLEY GRAY is a Professor of Computer Science and Chair of Interactive Information Technology at the University of Hartford, West Hartford, CT, and the principal of Gray Software Development. As an educator and consultant, he has been involved with computers and software development for over 18 years. He is the author of Interprocess Communications in UNIX: The Nooks & Crannies.

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