CAD/CAM of Sculptured Surfaces on a Multi-axis NC Machine: The DG/K-based Approach

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Morgan & Claypool Publishers, 2008 - Computers - 113 pages
Many products are designed with aesthetic sculptured surfaces to enhance their appearance, an important factor in customer satisfaction, especially for automotive and consumer electronics products. In other cases, products have sculptured surfaces to meet functional requirements. Functional surfaces interact with the environment or with other surfaces. Because of this, functional surfaces can also be called dynamic surfaces. Functional surfaces do not possess the property to slide over itself, which causes significant complexity in machining of sculptured surfaces. The application of multiaxis numerically controlled (NC) machines is the only way for an efficient machining of sculptured surfaces. Reduction of machining time is a critical issue when machining sculptured surfaces on multiaxis NC machines. To reduce the machining cost of a sculptured surface, the machining time must be as short as possible.Table of Contents: Introduction / Analytical Representation of Scupltured Surfaces / Kinematics of Sculptured-Surface Machining / Analytical Description of the Geometry of Contact of the Sculptured Surface and of the Generating Surface of the Form-Cutting Tool / Form-Cutting Tools of Optimal Design / Conditions of Proper Sculptured-Surface Generation / Predicted Accuracy of the Machined Sculptured Surface / Optimal Sculptured-Surface Machining
 

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Contents

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1
II
5
IV
11
VI
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VIII
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IX
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X
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XXVI
60
XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XL
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XLI
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About the author (2008)

Stephen P. Radzevich is a professor of mechanical engineering and manufacturing engineering.

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