CMOS Hotplate Chemical Microsensors

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Springer Science & Business Media, Apr 19, 2007 - Technology & Engineering - 125 pages
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The first comprehensive text on microhotplate-based chemical sensor systems in CMOS-technology covers all aspects of successful sensor prototyping: theoretical considerations for modelling, controller- and system design, simulation of circuits and microsensors, design considerations, microfabrication, packaging and testing. A whole family of metal-oxide based microsensor systems with increasing complexity is presented, including fully integrated sensor arrays. This represents one of the first examples of integrated nanomaterials, microtechnology and embedded circuitry.

 

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Contents

Introduction
2
Miniaturized MetalOxide Sensors
5
Thermal Modelling of CMOS Microhotplates
17
Microhotplates in CMOS Technology
29
Monolithic Gas Sensor Systems
61
Microsensor Arrays
86
Conclusion and Outlook
107
References
112
Subject Index
122
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About the author (2007)

Markus Graf: Degree in Physics: 1992-1999 University of Konstanz, Germany, Exchange year at the University Joseph-Fourier, Grenoble, France, Research Assistant: 1999 Microelectronic Center MIC, Lyngby, Denmark, PhD:1999-2004 Physical Electronics Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich, Switzerland, Postdoc: since Feb. 2004, Laureate of the Swiss Technology Award 2004 (together with Diego Barrettino, Stefano Taschini and Andreas Hierlemann) for the subjects covered by the book. Research interest: Integrated chemical sensors and CMOS-compatible micromachining.

Diego  Barrettino: Dipl.-Ing. degree in electrical engineering: University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, Professional experience: 1997-2000 Analog IC designer at Allegro Microsystems Argentina, PhD: 2000-2004 Physical Electronics Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich, Switzerland, Postdoc: since April 2004, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA, Laureate of the Swiss Technology Award 2004 (together with Markus Graf, Stefano Taschini and Andreas Hierlemann) for the subjects covered by the book. Research interest: analog and digital IC design and the application of control theory in the design of microsystems and MEMS-based microsensors

Andreas Hierlemann: Extensive experience in chemical sensors: PhD: University of Tuebingen on polymer-based acoustic chemical sensors 1992-1996, Postdoc: Sandia National Laboratories: Chemical Microsensor and sensitive-layer development 1997/1998, ETHZ: CMOS chemical microsensor and systems since 1999, Professor since June 2004

Henry Baltes: Professor of Physical Electronics at ETH Zurich and the Director of the Physical Electronics Laboratory (PEL) since 1988. As of June 1, 2004 he is on leave in order to act as Chairman of the ETH Zurich Center of Biosystems Science and Engineering to be located at Basel. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and a Member of the Swiss Academy of Technical Sciences. He received the European Science Award of the Koerber Foundation in 1998, the Wilhelm Exner Medal of the Austrian Trade Association in 1999, the degree of Doctor of Engineering (honoris causa) of the University of Waterloo in 2000, and Doctor of Electronic Engineering (ad honorem) of the Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna in 2003. He joined the Proceedings of the IEEE in 2004. He is a co-founder of the spin-off company SENSIRION. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and a Member of the Swiss Academy of Technical Sciences. He received the European Science Award of the Koerber Foundation in 1998, the Wilhelm Exner Medal of the Austrian Trade Association in 1999, the degree of Doctor of Engineering (honoris causa) of the University of Waterloo in 2000, and Doctor of Electronic Engineering (ad honorem) of the Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna in 2003. He joined the Proceedings of the IEEE in 2004. In 1996 he was Visiting Professor at Stanford University and the University of Waterloo. In 2002/03 he was Visiting Scientist at the Ritsumeikan University, the University of Bologna, and the University of Freiburg, Germany. He is a member of the Scientific Council of the Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems (IMM) of the Italian National Research Council. He also is a member of the International Scientific Committee of the Advanced Research Center on Electronic Systems (ARCES) of the University of Bologna. He is co-editor of the Wiley-VCH book series SENSORS UPDATE and ADVANCED MICRO AND NANOSYSTEMS as well as the Springer book series MICROTECHNOLOGY AND MEMS. From 1991 to 1995 he was the program director of the Swiss Priority Program LESIT. Prior to 1988, he held the Henry Marshall Tory Chair at the University of Alberta, where he was Acting President of the Alberta Microelectronics Centre and a co-founder and Director of LSI Logic Corporation of Canada. From 1974 to 1982 he worked for Landis & Gyr Zug (now Siemens) Switzerland, where he directed the solid-state device laboratory. He received the D. Sc. degree from ETH Zurich in 1971.