CREOLES OF LOUISIANA

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Pelican Publishing Company, Jul 30, 2000 - History - 312 pages
Louisiana is known for its rich, complex cultural heritage, but even in Louisiana, the question "What is a Creole?" is often answered in a number of ways. In Creoles of Louisiana, George Washington Cable knowledgeably addresses this question with precision and aplomb. Originally published in 1884, Creoles of Louisiana builds on earlier explorations of the lives of the white descendants of early French and Spanish immigrants during the transitory post-Civil War period. Cable wrote faithful portrayals of the Creoles, with a pioneering ear for the dialect that earned him an acclaimed place as a leader of the local colorist movement. From the early settlement of Louisiana, to the trials of the War Between the States, to the yellow fever epidemic, and on to "Brighter Skies," the chapters chronicle the Creoles' experience in the Pelican state. New Orleans emerges as a town carved out of the wilderness of the bayou, and together, city and citizens flourished.
 

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SPANISH NEW ORLEANS
HOW
S PAIN AGAINST
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RLEANS
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About the author (2000)

One of the greatest and most celebrated Southern writers of his day, George Washington Cable (1844-1925) helped lead the local-color movement of the late 1800s with his pioneering use of dialect and his skill in the short-story form. After serving in the Confederate army, he began to write for the New Orleans Picayune. Cable has been called the most important Southern artist working in the late-nineteenth century, as well as the first modern Southern writer. A complete listing of his books published by Pelican is available by request.

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