C# & VB.NET Conversion Pocket Reference

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"O'Reilly Media, Inc.", Apr 22, 2002 - Computers - 139 pages

Though most programmers use two or more languages, they usually have a mastery of one. Although Microsoft has advertised that the .NET runtime is language agnostic and that C# and Visual Basic .NET are so close that switching between the two is really quite easy, that?s only true up to a point. Some of the differences are obvious, but others are very subtle. C# & VB.NET Conversion Pocket Reference helps you easily make the switch from one language to another.

The differences occur in three main areas: syntax, object-oriented principles, and the Visual Studio .NET IDE. Syntax concerns the statements and language elements. Object oriented differences are less obvious, and concern differences in implementation and feature sets between the two languages. IDE differences include things like compiler settings or attributes. There is also a fourth area of difference: language features that are present in one language but have no equivalent in the other. These unique language features are also covered in this book.

C# & VB.NET Conversion Pocket Reference is a perfect companion for documents and books that don?t have examples using your mastered language. Author Jose Mojica expects that you know one of the two languages, but does not make an assumption about which one. He presents the information in a language-neutral point of view so that programmers from either background can read a section and feel that it is targeted to them.

 

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C# & VB.NET Conversion Pocket Reference: Pocket Reference by Jose Mojica is a guide that conveys the deviations, different syntax, functions, parameters, variables. The author accurately communicates the variations and technical jargon between the two languages vigorously and in a language simplistic enough for 'newbies' to grasp. As the evolution of technical Science evolves so too does the language, none more so than computer code. A guide for those wanting to have a better understanding of the simplistic differences that make both programs so very different.
`Reading for your pleasure.
 

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Contents

Syntax Differences
4
Line Termination
6
Comments
7
Namespace Declaration and Usage
8
Variable Declaration
11
Variable Initialization
13
Declaring Function Parameters
14
Passing Function Parameters
17
ObjectOriented Features
66
Method Overloading
67
Constructors and Field Initializers
70
Invoking Other Constructors
71
Invoking Base Constructors
73
Initializers
75
Hiding Base Class Members
77
Overriding Methods
82

Optional Parameters
19
Method Declaration
20
Returning Output Parameters
21
Program Startup
23
Exiting ProgramsMethodsLoops
25
Member Scope
28
Static and Shared Methods
29
Classes Versus Modules
31
If Statements
33
ShortCircuiting
36
Conditional Statement
38
Properties and Indexers
39
Arrays
45
for Loops
50
ForEach Loops
53
TryCatch Blocks
55
Attribute Usage
57
Control Characters
59
Type Comparison and Conversion
61
RequiringPreventing Inheritance
88
Declaring and Implementing Interfaces
91
Delegates and Events
105
Comparing Classes
111
String Comparisons
118
IDE Differences
120
DefaultRoot Namespace
123
Startup Object
125
Appico
126
COM References
127
Compiler Constants
128
Option Explicit Option Strict Option Compare
130
Errors and Warnings
131
Unique Language Features
132
using C
133
Documentation Comments C
135
Operator Overloading C
136
Late Binding VB
138
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Jose Mojica is an instructor and researcher at DevelopMentor, a company that's gained an international reputation for its experience with COM and COM+. He teaches various courses that focus on enterprise development in COM+, IIS, .NET, and Visual Basic. Before joining DevelopMentor, Jose was a consultant at IBM, writing DCOM servers that performed speech recognition and creating ActiveX controls in ATL for the ViaVoice SDK. He has worked with Visual Basic since Version 1.0. Jose is the author of Building ActiveX Controls with Visual Basic 5.0 and coauthor of Programming Internet Controls and Distributed Applications for Visual C++ 6.0 MCSD Training Kit.

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