Cabin Fever

Front Cover
Penguin Random House Australia, May 5, 2008 - Fiction - 336 pages
3 Reviews
Vera has cabin fever. Confined with her thoughts in the concrete tower of aNew York hotel, she is haunted by her mother's reminders of what she should have been, and the desperate choices she faced as an unprotected single mother.
Elizabeth Jolley writes lucidly of betrayal and survival, loneliness and desire, and with compassion for the sad dislocations of love between parents and children. In Cabin Fever, the second novel in a semi-autobiographical trilogy, she beguiles with her particular blend of humour and the serious.
'Her fiction shines and shines and shines, like a good deed in a naughty world.' - Angela Carter, New York Times Book Review

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - SeriousGrace - LibraryThing

We don't really move forward chronologically in this "sequel" to My Father's Moon. When we last left Vera, she was a single mother dealing with her own overbearing mother. The story bounced between ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - TheWasp - LibraryThing

This book continues Vera Wright's story of her struggle as a single parent after WWII. It is builds on the previous "MY FATHER'S MOON", giving a greater insight into what happened to Vera after she ... Read full review

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About the author (2008)

Elizabeth Jolley was one of Australia's most celebrated writers, with a formidable international reputation. She was recognised in Australia with an AO for services to literature and was awarded Honorary Doctorates from Curtin University (1986); Macquarie (1995), Queensland (1997) and The University of New South Wales (2000).

Born in England in 1923, she was brought up in a strict, German-speaking household and attended a Quaker boarding school. She became a nurse, married Leonard Jolley and with three children moved to Western Australia in 1959. In 1974 she started teaching creative writing at Fremantle Arts Centre.

Although she wrote all her life, it was not until she was in her fifties that her books started to receive the recognition they deserved. She won The Age Book of the Year Award on three separate occasions (for Mr Scobie's Riddle, My Father's Moon and The Georges' Wife) and she won the Miles Franklin Award for The Well, as well as many other awards. Her last two novels published by Penguin were An Accommodating Spouse (1999) and An Innocent Gentleman (2001). Her non-fiction collection, Learning to Dance was published in 2006.

Elizabeth Jolley died in 2007.

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