Calculus Made Easy

Front Cover
Macmillan, Oct 15, 1998 - Mathematics - 330 pages
6 Reviews

Calculus Made Easy has long been the most popular calculus primer, and this major revision of the classic math text makes the subject at hand still more comprehensible to readers of all levels. With a new introduction, three new chapters, modernized language and methods throughout, and an appendix of challenging and enjoyable practice problems, Calculus Made Easy has been thoroughly updated for the modern reader.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nmarun - LibraryThing

I'm a software developer and have had my interests in Mathematics for quite some time now. But my knowledge about Calculus was very limited. Hence I picked up this book. The book has real simple ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - arron_kau - LibraryThing

Available for free on project Gutenberg as a beautifully typeset PDF, this amazing little book presents the most fundamental ideas of the calculus in a surprisingly approachable way. It's certainly light on rigor, but for an introductory primer,that's not such a terrible thing. Read full review

Contents

Preface to the 1998 Edition
1
Preliminary Chapters by Martin Gardner 1 What Is a Function?
10
What Is a Limit?
18
What Is a Derivative?
30
Calculus Made Easy by Silvanus P Thompson Publishers Note on the Third Edition
36
Prologue
38
To Deliver You from the Preliminary Terrors
39
On Different Degrees of Smallness
41
Geometrical Meaning of Differentiation
103
Maxima and Minima
116
Curvature of Curves
132
Partial Fractions and Inverse Functions
139
On True Compound Interest and the Law of Organic Growth
150
How to Deal with Sines and Cosines
175
Partial Differentiation
184
Integration
191

On Relative Growings
45
Simplest Cases
51
Next Stage What to Do with Constants
59
Sums Differences Products and Quotients
67
Successive Differentiation
79
When Time Varies
83
Introducing a Useful Dodge
94
Integrating as the Reverse
198
A Little More about Curvature of Curves
249
How to Find the Length of an Arc on
263
Epilogue and Apologue
279
Index
326
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Silvanus P. Thompson, born in 1851, was elected to the Royal Society in 1891. He wrote numerous technical books and manuals on electricity, magnetism, dynamos, and optics, as well as several popular biographies of prominent scientists. Thompson died in 1916.

Martin Gardner, born in 1914, has written several reviews for The New York Review of Books and was a Scientific American columnist for over twenty-five years. He lives in Hendersonville, North Carolina.

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