Caleb Williams

Front Cover
Broadview Press, Sep 14, 2000 - Fiction - 576 pages
2 Reviews

William Godwin was one of the most popular novelists of the Romantic era; P.B. Shelley praised him, Byron drew heavily on his narrative style, and Mary Shelley, Godwin’s daughter, dedicated Frankenstein to him.

Caleb Williams is the riveting account of a young man whose curiosity leads him to pry into a murder from the past. The first novel of crime and detection in English literature, Caleb Williams is also a powerful exposť of the evils and inequities of the political and social system in 1790s Britain.

In addition to the text itself, the editors have included an extensive selection of primary source materials from the period, ranging from Godwin’s original manuscript ending and excerpts from his political writings to contemporary reviews, the political writings of Burke and Paine, and materials on criminals and the English prison system.

 

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Review: Caleb Williams

User Review  - Jed - Goodreads

Godwin was referred to as the "Infernal Quixote" in his time, because he was an atheistic and quasi-anarchistic idealist. (This makes me think that we, as a culture, need to work on our nicknames. The ... Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER I
59
CHAPTER II
67
CHAPTER III
74
CHAPTER IV
82
CHAPTER V
91
CHAPTER VI
98
CHAPTER VII
109
CHAPTER VIII
119
CHAPTER IX
358
CHAPTER X
366
CHAPTER XI
374
CHAPTER XII
381
CHAPTER XIII
391
CHAPTER XIV
408
CHAPTER XV
419
The Composition of the Novel
435

CHAPTER IX
131
CHAPTER X
146
CHAPTER XI
157
CHAPTER XII
166
VOLUME THE SECOND
177
CHAPTER I
179
CHAPTER II
188
CHAPTER III
194
CHAPTER IV
198
CHAPTER V
203
CHAPTER VI
210
CHAPTER VII
219
CHAPTER VIII
227
CHAPTER IX
238
CHAPTER X
247
CHAPTER XI
262
CHAPTER XII
271
CHAPTER XIII
274
CHAPTER XIV
284
VOLUME THE THIRD
295
CHAPTER I
297
CHAPTER II
304
CHAPTER III
314
CHAPTER IV
322
CHAPTER V
329
CHAPTER VI
335
CHAPTER VII
343
CHAPTER VIII
351
R Bentley 1832
443
3 Godwins Account of the Novels Aims from the British Critic 6 July 1795 9495
450
Pickering Chatto 1993
453
The Foundations of the Novel Godwins Political Philosophy and England in the 1790s
468
ii From Thomas Paine Rights of Man 1791
476
2 From William Godwin Enquiry Concerning Political Justice and its Influence on General Virtue and Happiness 1793
483
3 From William Godwin Enquiry Concerning Political Justice 1796
492
4 From Godwins Correspondence
498
Criminal Lives and the State of the Prisons
508
2 From John Howard The State of the Prisons 1777
515
Literary Influences Crime and Pursuit Narratives and Scenes of Confrontation
519
2 From The History of Madamoiselle de St Phale Giving a Full Account of The Miraculous Conversion of a Noble French Lady And her Daughter to...
522
3 From Daniel Defoe The History and Remarkable Life of the Truly Honourable Col Jacque Commonly Called Col Jack 1722
526
4 From Samuel Richardson Pamela Or Virtue Rewarded 174041
531
5 From Thomas Holcroft Anna St Ives 1792
537
The Influence of Caleb Williams
543
or Maria Posthumous Works London 1798
548
Contemporary Reviews
554
7071
555
44447
556
14549
559
16675
562
485501
564
7 From William Hazlitt The Spirit of the Age 1825
567
209
568
Works CitedRecommended Reading
569
Copyright

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Page 20 - Supposing the chambermaid had been my wife, my mother or my benefactor. This would not alter the truth of the proposition. The life of Fenelon would still be more valuable than that of the chambermaid; and justice, pure, unadulterated justice ... would have taught me to save the life of Fenelon at the expence of the other
Page 10 - It is now known to philosophers, that the spirit and character of the government intrudes itself into every rank of society. But this is a truth, highly worthy to be communicated, to persons, whom books of philosophy and science are never likely to reach.
Page 20 - was of more worth than his chambermaid, and there are few of us that would hesitate to pronounce, if his palace were in flames, and the life of only one of them could be preserved, which of the two ought to be preferred.

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About the author (2000)

Gary Handwerk is a Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Washington.

The late A.A. Markley was an Assistant Professor of English at Penn State University, Delaware County. Both have written extensively on Romantic literature, and have edited the Broadview edition of Godwin’s Fleetwood.

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