California Prune Industry: History and Importance of the Prune Industry, Methods of Cultivation, Varieties, Picking, Curing, Packing, and Production

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State Office, A.J. Johnston, Superintendent State Printing, 1892 - Fruit-culture - 33 pages
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Page 4 - District. JL MOSHER, Auditor San Francisco, Commissioner for the State at Large. FRANK A. KIMBALL National City, Commissioner for the State at Large.
Page 28 - Prunes are usually graded before drying, and various home-made contrivances1 are employed. Some use inclined planes of adjustable slats, the grader being thus available for other fruits than prunes; the large fruit rolls along into receptacles at the bottom, while the small fruit falls through into other receptacles. Other grading devices are made with wire screens, or riddles of different sizes of mesh. Some of them work on the principle of a fanning mill, three to four riddles placed above one...
Page 32 - ... indispensable. The fruit is usually gathered after the heat of the day has dissipated the humidity of the night. When possible, straw is carefully spread beneath the trees to prevent the fruit coming in contact with the earth. The prevailing custom, however, is to harrow the ground before gathering the plums. Only such fruit as readily falls when the tree is slightly shaken is gathered. As soon as harvested the fruit is taken to a building, properly called the fruitery, where it remains for a...
Page 28 - PICKING AND CURING. PROCESS OF GATHERING. The prune is picked from the tree when fully ripe, which is indicated when it passes from light reddish to purple, and by the withering condition of the fruit. It is very important that the fruit be thoroughly ripe, or else when dried it will be devoid of that rich flavor so essential in a marketable fruit. In most sections the prune upon ripening has a tendency to drop to the ground, which fruit is gathered and processed with the rest of the crop. The picking...
Page 16 - Prune d'Ente of Bordeaux. PRUNE D'ENTE. Syn., Robe de Sergent. [Fig. 7, Plate II.] In the past few years much has been written and said about a prune known by its synonym of " Robe de Sergent," and has been classed under various types of prunes grown in several districts of France. This variety was originally imported from France by Mr. John Rock, of Niles, Alameda County, and also by Mr. WB West, of Stockton. There is quite a marked difference in the size and quality of this prune compared with...
Page 9 - ... growth. PLANTING SYSTEMS. In order that the most approved planting systems may be better understood, they are illustrated to show how the orchard is first laid out, and how the trees look after several years of growth. The Square System. This is the most approved method. The orchard is laid off in lines crossing each other, with equal intervals of space, and a tree planted at each crossing of the lines. By the square method, at twenty feet apart, one hundred and eight trees are planted to the...
Page 23 - There has been considerable discussion during the last few years as to what is the true Myrobalan, and it must be acknowledged that some of the refined distinctions which have been mooted do not seem to be well placed. Seedlings grown from the seed of the Myrobalan vary, as do other fruit seedlings, both in fruit and in foliage and habit of trees; and perhaps this fact has given rise to the distinction between "true" and "false
Page 7 - ... and reaches its best in a rich and heavy soil with a good underdrainage, but with a sufficient moisture to feed it. The prime requisites in the prune are a solid, firm flesh that will not ferment at|the pit in drying; a rich, fruity flavor and bouquet, and a keeping quality that will stand the tests of months or years without serious loss from shrinkage; and those sections which possess the peculiarities of soil and climate which insure these in the greatest perfection are the true and only places...

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