Calixtus the Second, 1119-1124

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BRILL, 2004 - Religion - 540 pages
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Calixtus II (1119-1124) transformed the orientation of the papacy by signing the Concordat of Worms with the emperor, Henry V, in 1122, resolving the conflict over imperial investiture of bishops. As the tough-minded archbishop of Vienne, he had opposed the emperor and anyone else who stood in his way. As pope, he aggressively promoted the authority of the papacy, but suffered defeat in South Italy. To gain Henry V s support, he jettisoned his life-long opposition, and compromised over investitures. Students of the medieval papacy will find that this new interpretation of a pivotal pope challenges many of the conventional conceptions.
 

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Contents

Guy as Archbishop The Velvet Glove
15
Acting on a Larger Stage
34
Election as Pope
58
England and the German Alliance
77
York Versus Canterbury
93
PapalAngloNorman Negotiations
115
The Victory of Calixtus and Thurstan
127
Thurstan in York
146
Entry into Italy
289
Corsica
301
Italy and the Normans
313
Burdinus Farfa and a Revisit to France
329
The Second Expedition to
341
The Background
357
1119 Negotiations Fail
371
The Concordat of Worms
383

England A Qualified Success
160
The Empire
179
Guys Family and Henry V
190
The Lay and Ecclesiastical Princes
210
Raymond Alfonso and Diego
229
Calixtus and Spain
242
The Denouement in Spain
255
France The Perspective of Geoffrey
268
The First Lateran Council
401
Cluny and Montecassino
425
New Ventures
441
The Final Years
459
Conclusion
474
Bibliography
487
Index
513
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Mary Stroll, Ph.D. (1975) in History, the University of California, San Diego, is a Visiting Scholar at UCSD. She has published three books with Brill, the last of which was The Medieval Abbey of Farfa (1998).

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