CALLED TO BE A SURGEON: Not For Bread Alone

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Author House, Oct 20, 2009 - Biography & Autobiography - 396 pages

This autobiography compares my medical training, both in England and the United States, and portrays the complications of trying to combine two different traditions regarding the practice of surgery on the two sides of the Atlantic. Tremendous changes have occurred with regard to medical knowledge since the end of the Second World War which has had a profound effect on the attitude of the doctors and the circumstances of their practices. How this played out in my life accounts for some interesting tensions. Yet I adhered to my original ideals throughout and still believe the practice of medicine to be a “calling”. Regrettably many factors beyond the doctor’s control have made the business aspects of medical practice of vital importance to too many of them.

 

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
12
Section 3
26
Section 4
47
Section 5
63
Section 6
72
Section 7
95
Section 8
104
Section 14
205
Section 15
215
Section 16
246
Section 17
260
Section 18
283
Section 19
290
Section 20
314
Section 21
329

Section 9
119
Section 10
143
Section 11
157
Section 12
184
Section 13
198
Section 22
343
Section 23
364
Section 24
366
Section 25
370
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

The author had the unique experience of undergoing a medical education and then the practice of surgery both in England and the United States at the end of World War II, and for forty or so years thereafter. He believed that the practice of medicine was a "calling" similar to that of the priesthood. He has advanced medical-surgical degrees. In England, MB.BChir from Cambridge University and a Fellowship from the Royal College of Surgeons. In the US, he has an MD from Harvard Medical School and a Fellowship from the American College of Surgeons and the American Academy of Pediatrics. His Residency training was in England under the National Health Service at the time of its inception. Because of the relative lack of specialties in England at that time, his experience in General and Pediatric Surgery was broad ranged and encompassing.

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