Calling Down Fire: Charles Grandison Finney and Revivalism in Jefferson County, New York, 1800-1840

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SUNY Press, Feb 13, 2003 - History - 193 pages
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Calling Down Fire examines the social and cultural influence of Jefferson County, New York, an isolated, agrarian setting, on the formation of Charles Grandison Finney’s theology and revival methods. Finney, who later became president of Oberlin College, was arguably the most innovative and influential revivalist of the Second Great Awakening. He pioneered methods which were widely adopted and promoted a theology that emphasized the ability of evangelists to save souls and the importance of free will in the salvation process. Marianne Perciaccante follows the course of religious enthusiasm and the evolution of the reform impulse in Jefferson County following Finney’s departure for more influential pulpits. When Finney began to preach in Jefferson County, he brought Baptist and Methodist piety to the Presbyterians of the northern section of the county. This pious fervor eventually was adopted widely by middle-class Presbyterians and Congregationalists and constituted an acceptance by elites of tempered, non-elite piety.
 

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An intersesting study on the social and cultural dynamics in Jefferson County, New York that are believed to have influenced the revivalist theology of Charles G. Finney in the 1800's. Read full review

Contents

III
1
IV
15
V
32
VI
37
VII
75
VIII
101
IX
129
X
133
XI
175
XII
185
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About the author (2003)

Marianne Perciaccante is an attorney and an independent historian.

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