Calm Examination of Dr. McMaster's Letters on Civil Government

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Charles U. Cushman, at the Office of the Newburgh telegram, 1832 - Church and state - 44 pages
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Page 18 - Be wise now therefore, O ye kings: be instructed, ye judges of the earth. Serve the LORD with fear, and rejoice with trembling. Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way, when his wrath is kindled but a little. Blessed are all they that put their trust in him.
Page 8 - For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to the evil. Wilt thou then not be afraid of the power? do that which is good. and thou shalt have praise of the same: for he is a minister of God to thee for good.
Page 33 - But if we are unwilling to be placed in this perilous situation, if we still will adhere to the design of a national government, or, which is the same thing, of a superintending power, under the direction of a common council, we must resolve to incorporate into our plan those ingredients which may be considered as forming the characteristic difference between a league and a government; we must extend the authority of the Union to the persons of the citizens — the only proper objects of government.
Page 40 - Thus saith the Lord, Stand ye in the ways, and see, and ask for the old paths, where is the good way, and walk therein, and ye shall find rest for your souls.
Page 8 - Wilt thou then not be afraid of the power? do that which is good. and thou shalt have praise of the same: for he is a minister of God to thee for good. But if thou do that which is evil, be afraid; for he beareth not the sword in vain: for he is the minister of God, a revenger to execute wrath upon him that doeth evil.
Page 38 - And if thy brother that dwelleth by thee be waxen poor, and be sold unto thee...
Page 4 - God, the Supreme Lord and King of all the world, hath ordained civil magistrates to be under him over the people, for his own glory and the public good; and, to this end, hath armed them with the power of the sword, for the defence and encouragement of them that are good, and for the punishment of evil doers.
Page 44 - The Constitution of the United States then forms a government, not a league; and whether it be formed by compact between the States, or in any other manner, its character is the same. It is a government in which all the people are represented, which operates directly on the people individually, not upon the States; they retained all the power they did not grant.
Page 38 - And he that stealeth a man, and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death.
Page 43 - Come, my people, enter thou into thy chambers, and shut thy doors about thee : hide thyself as it were for a little moment, until the indignation be overpast. For, behold, the Lord cometh out of his place to punish the inhabitants of the earth for their iniquity : the earth also shall disclose her blood, and shall no more cover her slain.

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