Cameras in the Courtroom: Television and the Pursuit of Justice

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2002 - Political Science - 195 pages
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Now in paperback and featuring a new preface by the authors, Cameras in the Courtroom looks at the effects of both allowing and barring television coverage of legal proceedings. Cohn and Dow examine landmark televised trials, including those of O. J. Simpson, the Menendez brothers, and William Kennedy Smith. Also, analyzing the impact of Court TV and the history of cameras in American courtrooms, the book strikes a balanced discussion among diverse opinions. In the new preface, the authors consider the effect of excluding television coverage from the upcoming trial of Zacarias Moussaoui on charges stemming from the September 11, 2001, terror attacks. The book also includes an array of interviews with judges, attorneys, jurors, witnesses, and legal scholars, shedding light on a subject that has become an important topic in both media and law.
 

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Contents

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About the author (2002)

\Marjorie Cohn is an associate professor at Thomas Jefferson School of Law in San Diego. A criminal defense attorney, she has appeared as a legal analyst for CBS News, Court TV, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, NPR, and BBC-London. Retired CBS News correspondent David Dow has covered many of the epic trials of the era--both O. J. Simpson trials, the Rodney King beating cases, the McMartin preschool molestation case, and the 'Twilight Zone' trial. The Emmy Award-winning journalist has served as adjunct instructor at the University of Southern California and occasional host of public radio shows 'To the Point' and 'Which Way, L.A.?'

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