Camilla: A Picture of Youth

Front Cover
The Floating Press, Jun 1, 2009 - Fiction - 1179 pages
2 Reviews
Though Frances Burney's novels significantly influenced writers such as Jane Austen, Austen satirizes the genre in her own novel Northanger Abbey, writing of it: 'It is only Cecilia, or Camilla, or Belinda'; or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour, are conveyed to the world in the best–chosen language." And later: 'I was thinking of that other stupid book , written by that woman they make such a fuss about, she who married the French emigrant.' 'I suppose you mean Camilla? 'Yes, that's the book; such unnatural stuff!... it is the horridest nonsense you can imagine; there's nothing in the world in it but an old man's playing at see-saw and learning Latin...' This critique, the justness of which was unfortunately lost on poor Catherine, brought them to the door of Mrs. Thorpe's lodgings."
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Renz0808 - LibraryThing

The story follows two sisters, Eugenia and Camilla, and their cousin, Indiana, in the months preceding their marriages. I have been meaning to read this book for a long time, I wanted to read some of ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DeeDee10 - LibraryThing

I really enjoyed this book even though it is really long and didn't really need to be, but the other got her point across. I laughed and snorted so much when I read this book. I can truly say that it ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter VII The Rooms
896
Chapter VIII Ways to the Heart
912
Chapter IX Counsels for Conquest
927
Chapter X Strictures Upon the Ton
946
Chapter XI Traits of Character
960
Chapter XII Traits of Eccentricity
985
Chapter XIII Traits of Instruction
1002
Chapter XIV A Demander
1013

BOOK II
101
Chapter I New Projects
102
Chapter II New Characters
116
Chapter III A Family Breakfast
152
Chapter IV A Public Breakfast
161
Chapter V A Raffle
188
Chapter VI A Barn
215
Chapter VII A Declaration
221
Chapter VIII An Answer
233
Chapter IX An Explication
243
Chapter X A Panic
249
Chapter XI Two Lovers
265
Chapter XII Two Doctors
278
Chapter XIII Two Ways of Looking at the Same Thing
293
Chapter XIV Two Retreats
304
Chapter XV Two Sides of a Question
313
BOOK III
324
Chapter I A Few Kind Offices
325
Chapter II A Pro and a Con
346
Chapter III An Authors Notion of Travelling
363
Chapter IV An Internal Detection
381
Chapter V An Authors Opinion of Visiting
397
Chapter VI An Authors Idea of Order
416
Chapter VII A Maternal Eye
435
Chapter VIII Modern Ideas of Duty
449
Chapter IX A Few Embarrassments
465
Chapter X Modern Ideas of Life
482
Chapter XI Modern Notions of Penitence
494
Chapter XII Airs and Graces
505
Chapter XIII Attic Adventures
522
BOOK IV
539
Chapter I A Few Explanations
540
Chapter II Specimens of Taste
556
Chapter III A Few Compliments
575
Chapter IV The Danger of Disguise
593
Chapter V Strictures on Deformity
609
Chapter VI Strictures on Beauty
621
Chapter VII The Pleadings of Pity
634
Chapter VIII The Disastrous Buskins
646
Chapter IX Three Golden Maxims
660
BOOK V
677
Chapter I A Pursuer
678
Chapter II An Adviser
689
Chapter III Various Confabulations
698
Chapter IV A Dodging
715
Chapter V A Sermon
723
Chapter VI A Chat
742
Chapter VII A Recall
755
Chapter VIII A Youth of the Times
768
BOOK VI
789
Chapter I A Walk by Moonlight
790
Chapter II The Pantiles
801
Chapter III Mount Ephraim
819
Chapter IV Knowle
834
Chapter V Mount Pleasant
857
Chapter VI The Accomplished Monkies
873
Chapter XV An Accorder
1028
Chapter XVI An Helper
1046
BOOK VII
1062
Chapter I The Right Style of Arguing
1063
Chapter II A Council
1072
Chapter III A Proposal of Marriage
1084
Chapter IV A BullDog
1093
Chapter V An Oak Tree
1105
Chapter VI A Call of the House
1118
Chapter VII The Triumph of Pride
1134
Chapter VIII A Summons to Happiness
1145
Chapter IX Offs and Ons
1163
Chapter X Resolutions
1176
Chapter XI Ease and Freedom
1189
Chapter XII Dilemmas
1203
Chapter XIII Live and Learn
1215
BOOK VIII
1231
Chapter I A Way to Make Friends
1232
Chapter II A Rage of Obliging
1249
Chapter III A Pleasant Adventure
1267
Chapter IV An Authors TimeKeeper
1280
Chapter V An Agreeable Hearing
1290
Chapter VI Ideas Upon Marriage
1307
Chapter VII How to Treat a Defamer
1316
Chapter VIII The Power of Prepossession
1333
Chapter IX A Scuffle
1345
Chapter X A Youthful Effusion
1360
Chapter XI The Computations of SelfLove
1380
BOOK IX
1392
Chapter I A Water Party
1393
Chapter II Touches of Wit and Humour
1421
Chapter III An Adieu
1442
Chapter IV A Modest Request
1454
Chapter V A SelfDissection
1474
Chapter VI A Reckoning
1481
Chapter VII Brides and No Brides
1500
Chapter VIII A Hint for Debtors
1513
Chapter IX A Lovers Eye
1531
Chapter X A Brides Resolves
1551
Chapter XI The Workings of Sorrow
1566
BOOK X
1582
Chapter I A Surprise
1583
Chapter II A Narrative
1595
Chapter III The Progress of Dissipation
1614
Chapter IV Hints Upon National Prejudice
1630
Chapter V The Operation of Terror
1650
Chapter VI The Reverse of a Mask
1676
Chapter VII A New View of an Old Mansion
1695
Chapter VIII A Last Resource
1709
Chapter IX A Spectacle
1730
Chapter X A Vision
1747
Chapter XI Means to Still Agitation
1756
Chapter XII Means to Obtain a Boon
1771
Chapter XIII Questions and Answers
1784
Chapter XIV The Last Touches of the Picture
1806
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Burney established her reputation with her novel Evelina. After a period in Queen Charlotte's court, she and her husband, Alexander d'Arblay, were interned by Napoleon and lived in France until 1815. Widowed in 1818, she spent the rest of her life in London.

Bibliographic information