Campaigning with Grant

Front Cover
Century Company, 1897 - Etats-Unis - 546 pages
Originally printed in 1897, this work provides an eyewitness account to two military efforts which lead to the defeat of the Confederacy--the breaking of the siege at Chatanooga, and the battle at Appomattox. Porter (a brigadier general in the Union army) also offers a portrait of Grant, detailing his daily acts, his personal traits and habits, and the motives that inspired him. Numerous maps and illustrations are included. Annotation copyrighted by Book News Inc., Portland, OR
 

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Page 459 - In reply, I would say that, peace being my great desire, there is but one condition I would insist upon, namely: that the men and officers surrendered shall be disqualified for taking up arms again against the Government of the United States until properly exchanged.
Page 457 - GENERAL : — I have received your note of this date. Though not entertaining the opinion you express on the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia...
Page 458 - April 7, 1865. GENERAL RE LEE Commanding CSA The result of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as my duty to shift from myself the responsibility of any further effusion of blood, by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the Confederate States army known as the Army of Northern Virginia.
Page 493 - Mr. President, I accept the commission, with gratitude for the high honor conferred. With the aid of the noble armies that have fought in so many fields for our common country, it will be my earnest endeavor not to disappoint your expectations. I feel the full weight of the responsibilities now devolving on me ; and I know that if they are met, it will be due to those armies, and above all, to the favor of that Providence which leads both nations and men.
Page 284 - There are many officers to whom these remarks are applicable to a greater or less degree, proportionate to their ability as soldiers, but what I want is to express my thanks to you and McPherson as the men to whom, above all others, I feel indebted for whatever I have had of success.
Page 284 - I feel all the gratitude this letter would express, giving it the most flattering construction. " The word you I use in the plural, intending it for McPherson also. I should write to him, and will some day, but starting in the morning, I do not know that I will find time just now. " Your friend, "US GRANT,
Page 359 - I beg to present you as a Christmas gift the city of Savannah, with one hundred and fifty heavy guns and plenty of ammunition, and also about twenty-five thousand bales of cotton.
Page 285 - I believe you are as brave, patriotic, and just as the great prototype, Washington ; as unselfish, kind-hearted, and honest as a man should be, but the chief characteristic is the simple faith in success you have always manifested, which I can liken to nothing else than the faith a Christian has in a Savior.
Page 474 - The arms, artillery, and public property to be parked and stacked, and turned over to the officers appointed by me to receive them. This will not embrace the side-arms of the officers, nor their private horses or baggage.
Page 464 - VI. .April 9, 1865. GENERAL : — I received your note of this morning on the picketline, whither I had come to meet you and ascertain definitely what terms were embraced in your proposition of yesterday with reference to the surrender of this army. I now request an interview in accordance with the offer contained in your letter of yesterday for that purpose. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, RE LEE, General To LIEUT.-GEN.

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