Campaigns of Curiosity: Journalistic Adventures of an American Girl in Late Victorian London

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Univ of Wisconsin Press, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 208 pages
In the 1890s American journalist Elizabeth L. Banks became an international phenomenon through a series of newspaper articles. Disguising herself in various costumes, Banks investigated and made public the working conditions of women in London. Writing from the perspective of an American girl, she explored and exposed a variety of employment, ranging from parlor maid to flower girl to American heiress. Banks demonstrated the capability of women for positions in journalism long held only by men.
 

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Contents

PAGE
viii
THE ALMIGHTY DOLLAR IN LONDON SOCIETY
97
THE PRICE OF A PEDIGREE
115
SWEEPING A CROSSING
129
CHAPTER
153
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Elizabeth L. Banks (1870-1938) was raised on a Wisconsin farm and graduated from the Milwaukee-Downer Female Seminary to work as a part. time reporter. During her career she worked as secretary to the American ambassador in Peru, "stunt girl," yellow journalist, author, investigative reporter, and freelance writer in both England and the United States. Mary Suzanne Schriber is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of English at Northern Illinois University. She is the author of Writing Home and Gender and the Writer's Imagination and editor of Telling Travels. Abbey Zink is assistant professor of English at Western Connecticut State University.

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