Campaigns of the One hundred and forty-sixth regiment, New York state volunteers: also known as Halleck's infantry, the Fifth Oneida, and Garrard's tigers

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G. P. Putnam's sons, 1915 - United States - 542 pages
 

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Page 96 - If he should leave a rear force at Fredericksburg, tempting you to fall upon it, it would fight in intrenchments and have you at disadvantage, and so, man for man, worst you at that point, while his main force would in some way be getting an advantage of you northward. In one word, I would not take any risk of being entangled upon the river, like an ox jumped half over a fence and liable to be torn by dogs from the rear without a fair chance to gore one way or kick the other.
Page 80 - Here the enemy had assumed a position of great natural strength, surrounded on all sides by a dense forest, filled with a tangled undergrowth, in the midst of which breastworks of logs had been constructed, with trees felled in front, so as to form an almost impenetrable abatis. His artillery swept the few narrow roads by which his position could be approached from the front, and commanded the adjacent woods.
Page 96 - In one word, I would not take any risk of being entangled upon the river, like an ox jumped half over a fence and liable to be torn by dogs front and rear without a fair chance to gore one way or kick the other. If Lee would come to my side of the river, I would keep on the same side, and fight him or act on the defense, according as might be my estimate of his strength relatively to my own. But these are mere suggestions which I desire to be controlled by the judgment of yourself and General Halleck.
Page 218 - At Cold Harbor no advantage whatever was gained to compensate for the heavy loss we sustained.
Page 82 - It was evident that a direct attack upon the enemy would be attended with great difficulty and loss, in view of the strength of his position and his superiority of numbers. It was therefore resolved to endeavor to turn his right flank, and gain his rear, leaving a force in front to hold him in check and conceal the movement. The execution of this plan was intrusted to Lieutenant-General Jackson, with his three divisions.
Page 444 - Age, 35 years. Enlisted at Syracuse, to serve three years, and mustered in as private, Co.
Page 398 - Age, 35 years. Enrolled at Albany, to serve three years; mustered in as assistant surgeon, September 10, 1862 ; discharged, December 7, 1862.
Page 202 - MORE desperate fighting has not been witnessed on this continent than that of the 5th and 6th of May. Our victory consisted in having successfully crossed a formidable stream, almost in the face of an enemy, and in getting the army together as a unit. We gained an advantage on the morning of the 6th, which, if it had been followed up, must have proven very decisive. In the evening the enemy gained an advantage ; but was speedily repulsed. As we stood at the close, the two armies were relatively in...
Page 180 - The enemy have appeared in force on the Orange pike, and are now reported forming line of battle in front of Griffin's division, Fifth Corps. I have directed General Warren to attack them at once with his whole force. Until this movement of the enemy is developed, the march of the corps must be suspended. I have, therefore, sent word to Hancock not to advance beyond Todd's Tavern for the present. I think the enemy is trying to delay our movement, and will not give battle, but of this we shall soon...
Page 411 - September 26, 1864 ; appointed musician and returned to company as private, no dates; mustered out with detachment. May 29,' 1865, at Washington, DC MATTHEWS, JOHN.— Age, 23 years.

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