Can Such Things Be?

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The Floating Press, Nov 1, 2012 - Fiction - 216 pages
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Ambrose Bierce gained literary acclaim as a skilled satirist and chronicler of battlefield bravery. In the thrilling collection Can Such Things Be?, the Devil's Dictionary scribe turns his attention to all things spooky and fantastical. It's the perfect collection to read in front of the fire on a dark and stormy night.
 

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Contents

The Death of Halpin Frayser
4
The Secret of Macargers Gulch
23
One Summer Night
32
The Moonlit Road
35
A Diagnosis of Death
47
Moxons Master
52
A Tough Tussle
65
One of Twins
75
The NightDoings at Deadmans
125
Beyond the Wall
136
A Psychological Shipwreck
147
The Middle Toe of the Right Foot
153
John Mortonsons Funeral
164
The Realm of the Unreal
166
John Bartines Watch
175
The Damned Thing
183

The Haunted Valley
84
A Jug of Sirup
98
Staley Flemings Hallucination
107
A Resumed Identity
111
A Baby Tramp
119
Haita the Shepherd
195
An Inhabitant of Carcosa
202
The Stranger
207
Endnotes
215
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About the author (2012)

Ambrose Bierce was a brilliant, bitter, and cynical journalist. He is also the author of several collections of ironic epigrams and at least one powerful story, "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge." Bierce was born in Ohio, where he had an unhappy childhood. He served in the Union army during the Civil War. Following the war, he moved to San Francisco, where he worked as a columnist for the newspaper the Examiner, for which he wrote a number of satirical sketches. Bierce wrote a number of horror stories, some poetry, and countless essays. He is best known, however, for The Cynic's Word Book (1906), retitled The Devil's Dictionary in 1911, a collection of such cynical definitions as "Marriage: the state or condition of a community consisting of a master, a mistress, and two slaves, making in all, two." Bierce's own marriage ended in divorce, and his life ended mysteriously. In 1913, he went to Mexico and vanished, presumably killed in the Mexican revolution.

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