Can You Trust a Tomato in January?

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Simon and Schuster, Jul 6, 1994 - Cooking - 240 pages
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Here is the great American ritual of supermarket shopping in all its Muzak-drenched, fluorescent-lit, coupon-clipped glory. In this fascinating expedition through the world of polished linoleum-tiled aisles, find out why peanut butter doesn't stick to the roof of your mouth anymore, discover the lost connection between graham crackers and sex, and learn what's really in the mysterious stuff they call Cool Whip.

Join author Vince Staten on his humorous and revealing journey through the secret life of our favorite supermarket items, as he uncovers the hidden histories and fascinating folklore behind the foods we take for granted. The results are truly amazing and reveal the answers to such questions as: Which has more lemon in it, Lemon Pledge or Country Time Lemonade? What is Spam-- and why is it so darn popular? What happened to the vanilla in Nabisco Nilla Wafers? Who thought of putting American cheese in an aerosol can, and is it really cheese, anyway?

 

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Can you trust a tomato in January?: everything you wanted to know (and a few things you didn't) about food in the grocery store

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This lighthearted look at the development of American supermarkets and famous brand-name foods is not intended for the health-conscious reader concerned about nutrition. Staten's entertaining ... Read full review

Contents

Food and Me
13
Men in Paper Hats
19
The Trip Begins
28
Produce
39
Cereal Cake Mixes Spices Flour Sugar
51
Canned Goods Coffee Tea
71
Canned Fruits Canned Vegetables Canned Juices
94
Pastas Macaroni and Cheese
100
Candy Cookies Paper Products
137
Soft Drinks
152
Potato Chips Pretzels
167
Health Foods Gourmet Foods Diet Foods Imported Foods
175
Milk Dairy Products Bread
178
Meat
200
The Checkout Lane
216
Index
227

Frozen Foods
106
Frozen Desserts
116

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About the author (1994)

Vince Staten is the author of ten previous books, including "Do Bald Men Get Half-Price Haircuts?" and "Do Pharmacists Sell Farms? (Did Trojans Use Trojans?" in paperback). His articles have appeared in the "Saturday Review, The New York Times, The Boston Globe, Kentucky Monthly, Bon Appetit, " and others. He teaches feature writing at the University of Louisville and lives in Prospect, Kentucky, with his wife, Judy, (their son, Will, is a freshman in college), and a cat, Lassie.

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