Canada 1911: The Decisive Election that Shaped the Country

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Dundurn, Jul 7, 2011 - Political Science - 378 pages
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One hundred years ago, Canadians went to the polls to decide the fate of their country in an election that raised issues vital to Canada’s national independence and its place in the world. Canadians faced a clear choice between free trade with the United States and fidelity to the British Empire, and the decisions they made in September 1911 helped shape Canada’s political and economic history for the rest of the century. Canada 1911 revisits and re-examines this momentous turn in Canadian history, when Canadians truly found themselves at a parting of the ways. It was Canada’s first great modern election and one of the first expressions of the birth of modern Canada. The poet Rudyard Kipling famously wrote at the time that this election was nothing less than a fight for Canada’s soul. This book will explain why.

 

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Contents

PREFACE
9
CHAPTER 1
15
CHAPTER 2
39
CHAPTER 3
71
CHAPTER 4
93
CHAPTER 5
117
CHAPTER 6
133
CHAPTER 7
165
CHAPTER 9
213
CHAPTER 10
245
EPILOGUE
281
APPENDIX I
307
APPENDIX II
311
NOTES
327
BIBLIOGRAPHY
361
INDEX
371

CHAPTER 8
191

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About the author (2011)

David MacKenzie is Associate Professor of History at Ryerson University and the author of several books on Canadian history and international relations.

Patrice Dutil is Associate Professor of Politics and Public Administration at Ryerson University. He is the founder of the Literary Review of Canada and President of The Champlain Society.

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