Canada and the End of Empire

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Phillip Alfred Buckner
UBC Press, 2005 - History - 328 pages
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Sir John Seeley once wrote that the British Empire was acquired in "a fit of absence of mind." Whatever the truth of this comment, it is certainly arguable that the Empire was dismantled in such a fit. This collection deals with a neglected subject in post-Confederation Canadian history - the implications to Canada and Canadians of British decolonization and the end of empire.

Canada and the End of Empire looks at Canadian diplomatic relations with the United Kingdom and the United States, the Suez crisis, the changing economic relationship with Great Britain in the 1950s and 1960s, the role of educational and cultural institutions in maintaining the British connection, the royal tour of 1959, the decision to adopt a new flag in 1964, the efforts to find a formula for repatriating the constitution, the Canadianization of the Royal Canadian Navy, and the attitude of First Nations to the changed nature of the Anglo-Canadian relationship. Historians in Commonwealth countries tend to view the end of British rule from a nationalist perspective. Canada and the End of Empire challenges this view and demonstrates the centrality of imperial history in Canadian historiography.

An important addition to the growing canon of empire studies and imperial history, this book will be of interest to historians of the Commonwealth, and to scholars and students interested in the relationship between colonialism and nationalism.

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About the author (2005)

Phillip Buckner is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of New Brunswick and Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies at the University of London.

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