Canada during the Victorian era: a historical review ...

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J. Durie & Son, 1897 - Canada - 81 pages
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Page 14 - I expected to find a contest between a government and a people: I found two nations warring in the bosom of a single state: I found a struggle, not of principles, but of races; and I perceived that it would be idle to attempt any amelioration of laws or institutions until we could first succeed in terminating the deadly animosity that now separates the inhabitants of Lower Canada into the hostile divisions of French and English.
Page 31 - ... American Continent. Without effecting the change so rapidly or so roughly as to shock the feelings and trample on the welfare of the existing generation, it must henceforth be the first and steady purpose of the British Government to establish an English population, with English laws and language, in this Province, and to trust its government to none but a decidedly English Legislature.
Page 35 - Men, my brothers, men the workers, ever reaping something new: That which they have done but earnest of the things that they shall do.
Page 29 - Catholics, might canse serious complications if not settled on sound principles of law which all can accept. One of the most encouraging results of this political system has been not merely the material development of the country, but the creation of that national sentiment which must lie at the basis of any political structure, if it is to withstand the storm of passion and faction which from time to time will beat against its walls. The government of an immense country like Canada is surrounded...
Page 26 - These representatives have all the rights and privileges of members of the organized provinces, and are not the mere territorial delegates of the United States Congress. The central or general government of the Dominion is administered by a governor-general, with the assistance of a ministry responsible to a Parliament composed of a Senate appointed by the crown, and a House of Commons elected under an electoral franchise practically on the very threshold of universal suffrage. This government has...
Page 22 - ... contributed for the most part by the taxpayers of the different municipalities in connection with which the educational system is worked out. In Ontario the class of school-houses is exceptionally good, and the apparatus excellent, and the extent to which the people tax themselves may be ascertained from the fact that the Government only contributes annually some $1,512,000 out of a total expenditure of about $4,200.000.
Page 17 - Papineau, after the establishment of the federal union ; but, unlike the majority of his compeers who struggled for popular rights, he was a prominent figure in public life until the very close of his career. All his days, even when his spirit was sorely tried by the obstinacy and...
Page 24 - Clockmaker" is still the only noteworthy evidence we have of the existence of humor among a practical people, and his " wise saws " and " sayings " were uttered fully half a century ago. Yet, on the whole, if great works are wanting nowadays, the intellectual movement is in the right direction, and according as the intellectual soil of Canada becomes enriched with the progress of culture, we may eventually look for a more generous fruition. The example of the United States, which has produced Poe,...
Page 20 - Columbia, whose mountains are rich with undeveloped treasures, and whose mild climate invites a considerable industrious population to cultivate its slopes and plateaus, and collect the riches of its river and deep-sea fisheries. Even that inhospitable Arctic region of the far northwest of Canada through which the Yukon and its tributaries flow appears to be rich with untold treasures of gold and other minerals, and promises to be a source of wealth to a country which is still in the infancy of its...
Page 34 - Chorus to the gloomy predictions of the enemies and lukewarm friends of the confederation, but Canadians will hardly allow themselves to be influenced by purely pessimistic utterances in the face of the difficulties that they have hitherto so successfully encountered, and of the courage and hopes that animate them for the future. For a century and a half the French Canadians fought and bled for their country ; they had to face famine and savages, war with the British, and, what was worse, the neglect...

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