Canada's Road to the Pacific War: Intelligence, Strategy, and the Far East Crisis

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UBC Press, Sep 12, 2011 - History - 312 pages
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In December 1941, Japan attacked multiple targets in the Far East and the Pacific, including Canadian battalions stationed in Hong Kong. The disaster suggested that the Allies were totally unprepared for war. This book dispels that assumption by offering the first in-depth account of Canadian intelligence gathering and strategic planning on the eve of the Pacific War.

Canadians worked closely with their US and Allied counterparts to develop a picture of Japan's intentions and a strategic plan to meet challenges in the Pacific. Although Canada wanted to avoid conflict with Japan until US participation was assured, policy makers anticipated action in the Pacific and made preparations for defence, which included the internment of Japanese Canadians. By highlighting Canada's role as a Pacific power, Timothy Wilford sheds new light on events that led to the crisis in the Far East, as well as to the creation of the Grand Alliance.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Canada and the Pacific Powers 192240
10
Intelligence Networks in Canada before the Pacific War
34
3 Developing a Far East Strategy December 1940 to July 1941
53
Diplomacy Deterrence and Hong Kong
78
5 Reassessing the Far East Crisis after the Asset Freeze August to October 1941
98
Canadian Defence Strategy for the North Pacific
119
Negotiation and Mobilization November 1941
142
8 The Coming of the Pacific War December 1941
170
Canadas Response to the Pacific Challenge
195
Glossary of Names
208
Chronology of Events 192242
212
Notes
217
Bibliography
257
Index
270
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Timothy Wilford received a doctorate in history from the University of Ottawa and specializes in twentieth-century military history.

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