Canadian Art in the Twentieth Century

Front Cover
Dundurn, Nov 1, 1999 - Art - 272 pages
0 Reviews

Canadian Art in the Twentieth Century is a survey of the richest, most controversial and perhaps most thoroughly confusing centuries in the whole history of the visual arts in Canada - the period from 1900 to the present. Murray shows how, beginning with Tonalism at the start of the century, new directions in art emerged - starting with our early Modernists, among them Tom Thomson and the Group of Seven. Today, Modernism has lost its dominance. Artists, critics, and the public alike are confronted by a scene of unprecedented variety and complexity. Murray discusses the social and political events of the century in combination with the cultural context; movements, ideas, attitudes, and styles; the important groups in Canadian art, and major and minor artists and their works. Fully documented, well researched and written with clarity and over four hundred illustrations in both black-and-white and colour, Murray's book is essential for understanding Canadian art of this century. As an introduction, it is excellent in both its scope and intelligence.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
7
Tonalism to PostImpressionism
11
Approaches to Abstraction
39
Innovations of the 1930s
59
the 1950s
85
PostPainterly Abstraction Minimal Art and PostMinimal Art
115
Alternate Practice
161
Developments in Representation PostModernism New Image Painting
185
Identity and Difference Memory the Environment
213
Chapter Notes
249
Chronology
257
Further Reading
260
Index
268
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1999)

Joan Murray is an eloquent spokesperson for the twentieth century in Canada, combining a critical eye with a historian's insight into wider trends. She is well known for her numerous books on Canadian art, which include her recent biography of Tom Thomson, Tom Thomson: Design for a Canadian Hero. As executive director of the Robert McLaughlin Gallery in Oshawa, she has organized numerous exhibitions.

Bibliographic information