Cancel Your Own Goddam Subscription: Notes and Asides from National Review

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ReadHowYouWant.com, 2010 - 388 pages
National Review has always published letters from readers. In 1965 the magazine decided that certain letters merited different treatment, and William F. Buckley, the editor, began a column called ''Notes & Asides'' in which he personally replied to the most notable and outrageous correspondence. Culled from four decades of the column, Cancel Your Own God dam Subscription includes exchanges with such well-known figures as Ronald Reagan, Richard Nixon, John Kenneth Galbraith, A.M. Rosenthal, Auberon Waugh, Arthur Schlesinger Jr., and many others. There are also hilarious exchanges with ordinary readers, as well as letters from Buckley to various organizations and government agencies. Combative, brilliant, and uproariously funny, Cancel Your Own God dam Subscription represents Buckley at his mischievous best.
 

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User Review  - jcovington - LibraryThing

The first 3 parts of the book are fantastic (esp. his run-on series of letters with Art Buchwald about their Hertz Rent-A-Car club memberships). I can see why he retired. The last part gets a little ... Read full review

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User Review  - wfzimmerman - LibraryThing

Entertaining, but (since it is mostly outtakes from old NRs) could have been longer. The one Buckley book that I reallyo want is [[God and Man at Yale]]. Read full review

Contents

KENNEDY CURES CANCER WFB COMBS HAIR
85
UP WITH TOM SELLECK DOWN WITH COMMUNISM
163
OUT OF THE DEPTHS INTO RETIREMENT
277
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
349
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About the author (2010)

Editor and writer William F. Buckley, Jr. was born in New York City on November 24, 1925. While at Yale University, he studied political science, history and economics and graduated with honors. In 1955, he founded the weekly journal National Review where he was editor in chief. He began his syndicated newspaper column in 1962 and his weekly television discussion program, Firing Line was syndicated in 1966. Buckley wrote "God and Man at Yale" (1951) which was an indictment of liberal education in the United States, "Up from Liberalism" (1959), "The Unmaking of a Mayor" (1966), which tells of his unsuccessful mayoral campaign as the Conservative Party candidate for New York City in 1965, and "Quotations from Chairman Bill" (1970). Buckley also wrote best selling stories of international intrigue whose titles include "Saving the Queen" (1976), "Stained Glass" (1978), "Who's on First" (1980), "Marco Polo, If You Can" (1981), and "See You Later, Alligator" (1985). He died on February 27, 2008.

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