Candide

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Dover Publications, Jan 1, 1991 - Fiction - 94 pages
2689 Reviews
Caustic and hilarious, Candide has ranked as one of the world's great satires since its first publication in 1759. It concerns the adventures of the youthful Candide, disciple of Dr. Pangloss, who was himself a disciple of Leibniz. In the course of his travels and adventures in Europe and South America, Candide saw and suffered such misfortune that it was difficult for him to believe this was "the best of all possible worlds" as Dr. Pangloss had assured him. Indeed, it seemed to be quite the opposite. In brilliantly skewering such na´vetÚ, Voltaire mercilessly exposes and satirizes romance, science, philosophy, religion, and government — the ideas and forces that permeate and control the lives of men.
After many trials and travails, Candide is reunited with Cunegonde, his sweetheart. He then buys a little farm in Turkey where he and Cunegonde, Dr. Pangloss and others all retire. In the end, Candide decides that the best thing in the world is to cultivate one's own garden. A selection of the Common Core State Standards Initiative.

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Review: Candide

User Review  - Pete - Goodreads

Candide (1759) by Voltaire is a short, entertaining satire that attacks Leibniz's view that we live in the best of all possible worlds. The word Panglossian comes from the book. The rhythm of the book ... Read full review

Review: Candide

User Review  - Zhyar Fazladdin - Goodreads

I got bored reading the first 30 pages, but after that it became more interesting . And the storyline wasn't very interesting. But the philosophical lessons of the book and the way the story reflects the events and the situation of that period of time. Read full review

Contents

How Candide was forced away from fair
30
Adventures of the Two Travellers with
37
What they saw in the Country of El Dorado
43
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

One of France's most celebrated citizens, Voltaire (1694?1778) is best known for his satirical novel Candide. His political treatises, which frequently put him at odds with the church and state, continue to exercise enormous influence on political theorists, philosophers, educators, and historians.

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