Candy-making Revolutionized: Confectionery from Vegetables

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Sturgis & Walton Company, 1912 - Confectionery - 154 pages
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Candy Makers and those who like to read about older cooking methods will find this book informative. the candy making methods which were revolutionary in 1912 now seem outdated 100 years later. These methods do still work and produce beautiful candy.
This book would have been a luxury for our Great-grandmothers to own. Nowdays its a window into the workings of their kitchens at the turn of the last century.
 

Contents

I
i
II
vi
III
3
V
8
VI
19
VII
24
VIII
27
IX
33
XV
93
XVI
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XVII
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XIX
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XXI
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XXII
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X
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XII
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XIII
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XXIII
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XXVI
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Page 49 - ... the protein and fat found in eggs, meat, breakfast cereals, and bread and butter take the place of those constituents that were at first exclusively furnished in milk. Milk, however, remains throughout childhood a valuable source of all these food principles. The fact that sugar has a high food value is not the only point to be considered. The child will easily obtain the needed carbohydrates in other forms, and will thrive if its digestion remains sound and its relish for wholesome food...
Page 51 - ... of its taste, may be taken when the appetite has been fully satisfied. Sugar is a useful and valuable food. It must, however, be remembered that it is a concentrated food and therefore should be eaten in moderate quantities. Further, like other concentrated foods, sugar seems best fitted for assimilation by the body when supplied with other materials which dilute it or give it the necessary bulk.
Page 49 - ... eggs, meat, breakfast cereals, and bread and butter take the place of those constituents that were at first exclusively furnished in milk. Milk, however, remains throughout childhood a valuable source of all these food principles. The fact that sugar has a high food value is not the only point to be considered. The child will easily obtain the needed carbohydrates in other forms, and will thrive if its digestion remains sound and its relish for wholesome food unimpaired. For instance, one often...
Page 50 - ... something which tastes more agreeable than the food which it is accustomed to have. When an infant has acquired a taste for cake or candy, it will cease to enjoy the food by which its development will be best perfected. It is, in fact, kinder to the infant never to allow it to taste cake or candy. When these articles are withheld, it will continue to have a healthy appetite and taste for necessary and proper articles of food.
Page 50 - ... some preparation of wheat or corn. This article of diet, eaten only with milk or cream, falls into the same class as bread and milk, and forms the simple, wholesome basis of a meal. The sugar given the child is better furnished in the occasional simple pudding, in the lump of sugar, or homemade candy, not that its food value is better utilized, but the whole food of the child is thus more wholesome.
Page 43 - Blythe says: Loaf sugar is, as a rule, chemically pure. It Is probably, indeed, the purest of all substances in commerce, and a large quantity may be burnt up without obtaining a trace of nitrogen and without leaving any residue. The only sugars that may be impure are the raw sugars.
Page 42 - ... this addition to his diet until the third week, when he began to show all the signs of overtraining — loss of weight, and a heavy, dull feeling, with no desire for study. On the third day after beginning the use of sugar these symptoms disappeared. At the time of the race both youths were in fine condition and were victorious over their antagonists, who did not believe in the use of sugar. No after bad effects were observed.
Page 50 - Those who have studied the food 535 habits of children seem to agree that sugar should from the very first be withheld from the dish that forms the staple food of the child — that is, the mush or porridge of oatmeal or other cereal. This article of diet, eaten only with milk or cream, falls into the same class as bread and milk and forms the simple, wholesome basis of a meal. The sugar given the child is better furnished in the occasional simple pudding, in the lump of sugar, or homemade candy,...
Page 62 - POTATOES Potatoes as a Foundation for Candy Mary Elizabeth Hall " Cooked potato fondant. Boil or steam potatoes and force them through a fine sieve. With one-half cupful of potato, so prepared, mix thoroughly two cupfuls of sugar and thin with two-thirds of a cupful of milk. Place the mixture on an asbestos mat over the fire and cook until thick — to the sticking point. Pour the mass on a cold, damp marble and " cut in
Page 42 - Two schoolboys, seventeen and nineteen years of age, with only two hours a day for practice, at the end of two months entered for the rowing races. No change had been made in their diet except that they ate as much sugar as they wished, sometimes as much as one-third of a pound at the time of their daily exercise. One of them, however, did not make this addition to his diet until the third week, when he began to show all the signs of overtraining — loss of weight, and a heavy, dull feeling, with...

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