Capacity Building for IT in Education in Developing Countries: IFIP TC3 WG3.1, 3.4 & 3.5 Working Conference on Capacity Building for IT in Education in Developing Countries 19–25 August 1997, Harare, Zimbabwe

Front Cover
Gail Marshall, Mikko Ruohonen
Springer Science & Business Media, Feb 28, 1998 - Computers - 360 pages
Deryn Watson CapBIT 97, Capacity Building for Information Technologies in Education in Developing Countries, from which this publication derives, was an invited IFIP working conference sponsored by Working Groups in secondary (WG 3. 1), elementary (WG 3. 5), and vocational and professional (WG 3. 4) education under the auspices ofIFIP Technical Committee for Education (TC3). The conference was held in Harare, Zimbabwe 25th - 29th August 1997. CapBIT '97 was the first time that the IFIP Technical Committee for Education had held a conference in a developing country. When the Computer Society of Zimbabwe offered to host the event, we determined that the location and conference topic reflect the importance of issues facing countries at all stages of developmen- especially Information Technologies (IT) development. Information Technologies have become, within a short time, one of the basic building blocks of modem industrial society. Understanding IT, and mastering basic skills and concepts of IT, are now regarded as part of the core education of all people around the world, alongside reading and writing. IT now permeates the business environment and underpins the success of modem corporations as well as providing government with cost-effective civil service systems. At the same time, the tools and technologies of IT are of value in the process of learning, and in the organisation and management of learning institutions.
 

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Contents

Nordic cooperation on Communication and Information Technologies and didactics in education
15
Building resource capacity for IT education and training in schools the case of Botswana
27
Computer education and human capacity building for Information Technology in Namibia
39
Schools with SPIRIT capacity building in The Netherlands
49
Information Technology in Norwegian education consistency of strategic initiatives for implementing IT in primary education
57
Development of Information Technology in Hong Kong education over the past decade
67
Fighting a lone battle for Computer Education in Nepal
75
Building Skills in the National Context
81
The European computer driving licence
213
Information literacy the missing link in education with special reference to developing countries
221
Maximizing the benefits of aid for Information Technology
231
Building capacity for Information Technology in educational management in developing countries
239
Information Technology resources for education in developing countries
251
A Curriculum for the Future
261
The need for a new perspective creating learning networks for African teachers change professional development and ICTs
263
Informatics for secondary education the UNESCOIFIP curriculum as a resource for developed and developing countries
275

Bridging the skills gap in Zimbabwe
83
Information Technology education and training initiatives the Nigerian experience
91
Using applications programs in a university to build human capacity for Information Technology
101
Targetted Projects
109
Infrastructure issues for implementation of portable computer use in schools
111
Capacity building with a difference
119
Principals Information Technology and leadership coping with professional development despite isolation
127
Communicate and Learn a collaborative project
137
The effect of network technology on education
143
Classroombased Initiatives
153
Technology and young children new strategies to prevent illiteracy and create better chances of success for all
155
Designing Logobased microworlds for effective learning a road to improving teacher education
163
Research for ITbased Education
173
The needs and challenges of Information Systems education the case of Nigerian Universities
175
Blame the technocentric artefact What research tells us about problems inhibiting teacher use of IT
185
Measuring success in the global village resources for conducting systematic and comprehensive evaluations in IT settings
193
Resource Acquisition Allocation and Utilization
203
The role of educational and professional bodies in guidance towards capacity planning
205
Workshop Presentations
289
Teaching informatics as a subject
291
Using hypermedia and the Internet in the teaching of mathematics
297
Information Technology and problem solving in mathematics education
299
Appropriate research in IT in emerging countries
309
Discussion Group Recommendations
317
Discussion Group 1 IT in curriculum and courseware development
319
GROUP 1B
322
GROUP 1C
324
Discussion Group 2 Policies strategies initiatives of ICT in education
327
Discussion Group 3 Guidelines and directions for ICT policy in education
333
Discussion Group 4 IT education delivery and learning
337
Discussion Group 5 Information Technology in institutional administration and management
343
Discussion Group 6 Building resource accessibility in developing countries
347
Alphabetical List of Conference Participants
351
KEYWORD INDEX
361
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Page ii - IFIP's aim is two-fold: to support information processing within its member countries and to encourage technology transfer to developing nations. As its mission statement clearly states, IF IP's mission is to be the leading, truly international, apolitical organization which encourages and assists in the development, exploitation and application of information technology for the benefit of all people. IFIP is a non-profitmaking organization, run almost solely by 2500 volunteers.
Page ii - IFIP was founded in 1960 under the auspices of UNESCO, following the First World Computer Congress held in Paris the previous year. An umbrella organization for societies working in information processing...
Page ii - ... collections of selected and edited papers. Any national society whose primary activity is in information may apply to become a full member of IFIP, although full membership is restricted to one society per country. Full members are entitled to vote at the annual General Assembly, National societies preferring a less committed involvement may apply for associate or corresponding membership. Associate members enjoy the same benefits as full members, but without voting rights. Corresponding members...

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