Capitalism and Social Democracy, Page 79

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Dec 26, 1986 - Philosophy - 269 pages
This is a study of the choices faced by socialist movements as they developed within capitalist societies. Professor Przeworski examines the three principal choices confronted by socialism: whether to work through elections; whether to rely exclusively on the working class; and whether to try to reform or abolish capitalism. He brings to his analysis a number of abstract models of political and economic structure, and illustrates the issues in the context of historical events, tracing the development of socialist strategies since the mid-nineteenth century. Several of the conclusions are novel and provocative. Professor Przeworski argues that economic issues cannot justify a socialist programme, and that the workers had good reasons to struggle for the improvement of capitalism. Therefore, the project of a socialist transformation, and the fight for economic advancement, were separate historical phenomena.
 

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Contents

Social Democracy as a Historical Phenomenon
7
Democratic Capitalism and Political Participation
10
Electoral Participation and Class Organization
13
The Promise of Elections
16
Social Democracy and the Working Class
19
The Electoral Dilemma
23
Reform and Revolution
29
Economic Projects and Political Realities
31
Further Evidence
126
Conclusion
128
Appendix
129
Material Bases of Consent
133
Capitalism Hegemony and Democracy
136
Reproduction of Consent of WageEarners
145
Accumulation and Legitimation
148
Conjunctures and Crises
157

The Compromise
35
The Abandonment of Reformism
38
Economic Bases of Class Compromise
42
Social Democracy and Socialism
43
Proletariat into a Class The Process of Class Formation
47
Scientific Socialism as of 1890
48
Who Are the Proletarians?
55
Proletarianization and Class Structure
59
And Where to Fit the Middle Class?
63
The Process of Class Formation
67
Democratic Capitalism and the Organization of Workers as a Class
73
Conflicts About Class
78
Surplus Labor and the Middle Class
82
Conclusion
90
Methodological Individualism and the Concept of Class
92
Party Strategy Class Organization and Individual Voting
99
The Dilemma of ClassBased Parties
102
The Electoral TradeOff
104
Party Strategies and Their Consequences
111
Choice and Necessity
114
Are Socialist Leaders VoteMaximizers?
118
Historical Patterns of Class Voting
121
Breakdown of Consent and Force
163
Material Interests Class Compromise and the State
171
The Problem Defined
172
The Form of Class Compromise
177
Conditions of Class Compromise
182
Beyond Capitalism
197
Class Conflict and the State
200
Democratic Capitalism at the Crossroads
205
The Keynesian Revolution as a Compromise
207
Economic Alternatives
211
Market Economics as a Political Project
218
Exploitation Class Conflict and Socialism The Ethical Materialism of John Roemer
223
Exploitation and Its Origins
224
Exploitation and Class Struggle
226
Exploitation Class Struggle and Accumulation
231
Exploitation and the Transition to Socialism
235
Social Democracy and Socialism
239
References
249
Name Index
263
Subject Index
267
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