Capt. Samuel Morey who Built a Steamboat Fourteen Years Before Fulton

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Standard Book Company, 1915 - Steamboats - 11 pages
 

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Page 8 - The astonishing sight of this man ascending the Connecticut river between Orford and Fairlee, in a little boat just large enough to contain himself and the rude machinery connected with the steam boiler, and a handful of wood for fire, was witnessed by the writer in his boyhood, and by others who yet survive.
Page 11 - Baltimore in the first instance, but shall postpone entirely anything further. When I have the pleasure to see you I hope to learn what will be the best course to be taken. It remains for me to have the engine applied to a carriage on a rail, road, and when that is done, I should think I have done my part. I can but hope and trust the ensuing winter will see the engine well applied to a carriage on a railroad. With sentiments of the greatest esteem and friendship, I am dear Sirs, as ever, Yours,...
Page 8 - ... this man, ascending the Connecticut river, between Orford and Fairlee, in a little boat just large enough to contain himself and the rude machinery connected with the steam boiler, and a handful of wood for a fire, was witnessed by the writer in his boyhood, and by others who yet survive. This was before Fulton's name had ever been mentioned in connection with steam navigation.
Page 8 - Mann, an educated man, of the strictest integrity, spent both time and research in investigation of the claims of Fulton, Morey, and others to the credit and honor of a practical success in steam navigation. The following is an extract from his book : " The credit of the original invention of the steamboat is commonly awarded to Robert Fulton, but it is believed that it belongs primarily and chiefly to a far more obscure individual. So far as is known the first steamboat ever seen on the waters of...
Page 5 - Morey was persuaded that the power of steam could be applied to propelling boats by means of paddle-wheels. He therefore set himself to the task of inventing a boat to be thus propelled by steam. He made the boat, built the steam engine, put in the necessary machinery and made his first trip with complete success, running several miles from Orford up the Connecticut River and returning at the rate of four miles per hour. This was as early as 1793, at least fourteen years before Fulton's trial trip...
Page 6 - ... his metropolitan friends(?) treated him with such coldness and indifference as clearly to indicate that they had fully acquired the secret of his invention and desired no further intercourse with him. The proof is positive that he made frequent trips in his little boat, but he was without money and far from leading scientific men and the best mechanical skill ; the result was that Fulion, aided by friends and money, built a large boat on the exact principle of Morey's, with paddle wheels, and...
Page 1 - ... should have been his. It is certain that the idea of steam navigation was then at work in several minds both in America and Europe. But it is also certain that Samuel Morey propelled a boat by steam on the Connecticut between Fairlee and Orford in 1793, years before Fulton's successful experiment. Had he comprehended the value of his own invention, and had he found such a wealthy and powerful patron as Fulton found in Chancellor Livingston, Samuel Morey and not Robert Fulton would be hailed as...
Page 11 - ... purposes I perfected last winter. Throughout the whole time I have been constantly perfecting the engine. I expect to leave here in two or three days for home to arrange my business for winter, and if possible to collect some money for you and Mr. Garrett, as well as some for myself, which I could do were there any in the country, as I have more than $3,000 of salable personal property and good debts. But whether I get any or not, you may expect to see me next month, if I am alive and well as...
Page 11 - ... with you, I could not perfect, to my mind, the application of the "new power" to a boat until within two weeks. It will now run as regular as any that are driven with steam, and with very little expense. The boat is about nineteen feet long, 5 J wide and the engine occupies only about eighteen inches of the stern, and sometimes goes between 7 and 8 miles per hour. The same engine may unquestionably, when in better hands, be made to drive one, properly constructed, of twice the capacity, at least...
Page 9 - Captain Morey made his first experimental trip on Sunday, during the hours of religious service, when the people were at church. He chose this time so that nobody should see him in case of failure. The people went to meeting those days. On a quiet Sunday, not far either way from 1790, this notable man with his rude craft, steamed up the river between Fairlee and Orford, entirely alone (this is probably a mistake), and on the following day announced his triumph to the astonished people. Honor to whom...

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