Captain Richard Ingle, the Maryland "pirate and Rebel," 1642-1653: A Paper

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J. Murphy & Company, 1884 - History - 53 pages
This book is a defense of a colonial-era captain who may or may not have been a pirate, written by one of his descendants.
 

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Page 2 - I hold it, that a little rebellion, now and then, is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical.
Page 21 - English there, to the number of a300 at least, and that an Indian whom they had since taken confessed, that they did it because they saw the English took up all their lands from them, and would drive them out of the country, and they took this season for that they understood that they were at war in England, and began to go to war among themselves, for they had seen a fight in the river between a London ship which was for the parliament and a Bristol ship which was for the king.
Page 50 - tis distinguished from thieving or larceny, implies not only the actual taking away of my goods, while I am, as we say, in peace, but also the putting me in fear, by taking them away by force and arms out of my hands, or in my sight and presence; when this is done upon the sea,, without a lawful commission of war or reprisals, it is downright Piracy.
Page 7 - Mo. 3. (May) 9.] The ship Eleanor of London, one Mr. Inglee master, arrived at Boston. She was laden with tobacco from Virginia, and having been about 14 days at sea, she was taken with such a tempest, as though all her sails were down and made up, yet they were blown from the yards, and she was laid over on one side two and a half hours, so low as the water stood upon her deck, and the sea...
Page 28 - Goates, and killed or mismarked almost all the Cattle, tooke or dispersed all the Servants, Carryed away a Great quantity of Sawn Boards from the pitts, and ript up Some floors of the house, And having by...
Page 24 - Ingle and afterwards almost for two years continued by his complices and confederates in which time most of your lordship's loyal friends here were spoiled of their whole estate and sent away as banished persons out of the province those few that remained were plundered...
Page 31 - Reformation, of London, and sailing to Maryland, where finding the Governor of that province to have received a commission from Oxford to seize upon all ships belonging to London, and to execute a tyrannical power against the Protestants, and such as adhered to the Parliament, and to press wicked oaths upon them, and to endeavor their extirpation...
Page 21 - On August 26, 1644, the House of Commons granted to eight vessels the right to carry victuals, clothes, arms, ammunition, etc., " for the supply and defence and relief of the planters of Virginia." One of these vessels was the Reformation, of which Ingle was still master. He was in London receiving cargo in October and was entrusted by Cornwallis with goods valued at 200 sterling. In a petition which he prepared in February, 1646, on his return to England, he said that on his arrival in Maryland...
Page 50 - It' the foregoing remarks are well founded, piracy may be said to consist in acts of violence done upon the ocean or unappropriated lands, or within the territory of a state through descent from the sea, by a body of men acting independently of any politically organised society.
Page 8 - Inglee master, arrived at Boston. She was laden with tobacco from Virginia, and having been about 14 days at sea, she was taken with such a tempest, as though all her sails were down and made up, yet they were blown from the yards, and she was laid over on one side two and a half hours, so low as the water stood upon her deck, and the sea over-raking her continually, and the day was as dark as if it had been night, and though they had cut her masts, yet she righted not till the tempest assuaged....

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