Captive Images: Race, Crime, Photography

Front Cover
Routledge-Cavendish, 2007 - Law - 137 pages
0 Reviews

Captive Images examines the law's treatment of photographic evidence and uses it to investigate the relationship between law, image and fantasy. Based around the scholarly examination of a bank robbery, in which a surveillance camera captures the robbery in progress, Katherine Biber draws upon critical writing from psychoanalysis, postcolonialism, art, law, literature and feminism to 'read' this crime, its texts and its images.

The result is an interdisciplinary study of crime that unfolds a compelling narrative about race relations, national identity and fear.

This book is an essential read for all levels of law students studying, or interested in, law, criminology and cultural studies.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (2007)

Katherine Biber is a legal scholar and historian in the Division of Law at Macquarie University, Australia, and has been a community worker and a film critic.

Bibliographic information