Captured: Sixteen Months as a Prisoner of War

Front Cover
George H. Doran Company, 1918 - World War, 1914-1918 - 179 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 189 - And Joshua had commanded the people saying, Ye shall not shout, nor make any noise with your voice, neither shall any word proceed out of your mouth, until the day I bid you shout; then shall ye shout.
Page 95 - I can quite easily see how men who have been in German hospitals or camps for two or three years become despondent, nervous wrecks and often go stark staring mad, or commit suicide.
Page vii - I trust that my attempt at the portrayal of the life of a Prisoner of War may in some way relieve the minds of the perplexed friends and relatives in that it tells them many things, which I was surprised to learn, are not already known.
Page 25 - Chuck" promised to bring Howard Brown, who happened also to be in the front line with the " Tock Emmas," over to see me the next day. He told me of a " strafe " they were putting on next morning about 8.30 and I promised to go over and observe for them.
Page 98 - CAMP their dead had given them an English book entitled "The Life of a Curate." There was a waiting list for all English books which were passed around the hospital as fast as they could be read. Lieutenant Douglas says that if they had had a copy of Webster's Dictionary it would have been devoured from cover to cover. The study of French attracted many of the Englishmen. Lieutenant Douglas exchanged lessons in English for instruction in French with a French captain in the hospital. They managed...
Page 137 - ... seen a newspaper printed in English since they had been taken prisoner. The French captain was an indefatigable worker and as soon as he was able to do so he commenced the study of French law through some books ordered from Paris. For a year and a half he lived, almost alone and maintained his sanity by very hard reading. In sheer desperation he had taken up the study of German with a sanitaire and even attempted English by himself. He made remarkable progress in English. As Lieutenant Douglas...
Page 137 - Times, a pro-German paper distrib-* uted free among the prisoners, they had not seen a newspaper printed in English since they had been taken prisoner. The French captain was an indefatigable worker and as soon as he was able to do so he commenced the study of French law through some books ordered from Paris. For a year and a half he lived, almost alone and maintained his sanity by very hard reading. In sheer desperation he had taken up the study of German with a sanitaire and even attempted English...
Page 25 - German aeroplane go up and finish it off. who wanted to see me. He turned out to be Bombardier " Chuck " Gibson who was with the sixtypound " Tock Emma " (Trench Mortar) Battery located on our frontage.
Page 110 - ... shorter, and .he knowledge of French acquired proved of great value to Lieutenant THE AMERICAN REVIEW OF REVIEWS Douglas later when he reached Switzerland. The men subscribed to the Kolnische Zeitung and every evening after supper they gathered around the table while someone translated the despatches. "We smiled when we read almost every day how the English had suffered Blutige Schlag (bloody defeat).
Page 116 - German agent who wrote me a very nice letter asking about my arm, and wanting to know if there was anything he could do for me. I was not allowed to answer this letter but the Inspector did so for me.

Bibliographic information