Capturing Sound: How Technology Has Changed Music

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University of California Press, Oct 2, 2004 - Business & Economics - 276 pages
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There is more to sound recording than just recording sound. Far from being simply a tool for the preservation of music, the technology is a catalyst. This is the clear message of "Capturing Sound, "a wide-ranging, deeply informative, consistently entertaining history of recording's profound impact on the musical life of the past century, from Edison to the Internet. In a series of case studies, Mark Katz explores how recording technology has encouraged new ways of listening to music, led performers to change their practices, and allowed entirely new musical genres to come into existence. An accompanying CD, featuring thirteen tracks from Chopin to Public Enemy, allows readers to hear what Katz means when he discusses music as varied as King Oliver's "Dippermouth Blues," a Jascha Heifetz recording of a Brahms Hungarian Dance, and Fatboy Slim's "Praise You."
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
CAUSES
8
MAKING AMERICA MORE MUSICAL THE PHONOGRAPH AND GOOD MUSIC
48
CAPTURING JAZZ
72
AESTHETICS OUT OF EXIGENCY VIOLIN VIBRATO AND THE PHONOGRAPH
85
THE RISE AND FALL OF GRAMMOPHONMUSIK
99
THE TURNTABLE AS WEAPON UNDERSTANDING THE DJ BATTLE
114
MUSIC IN 1s AND Os THE ART AND POLITICS OF DIGITAL SAMPLING
137
LISTENING IN CYBERSPACE
158
CONCLUSION
188
NOTES
193
REFERENCES
237
CD TRACKS AND PERMISSIONS
263
INDEX
265
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Mark Katz, Ph. D. and practicing therapist, specializes in children with multiple complex developmental disorders. He is the author of On Playing a Poor Hand Well: Insights from the Lives of Those Who Overcame Childhood Risks and Adversities.

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