Cardamom: The Genus Elettaria

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P. N. Ravindran, K.J. Madhusoodanan
CRC Press, Sep 2, 2003 - Science - 400 pages
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Cardamom otherwise known as Malabar cardamom, true cardamom or small cardamom second only to pepper in its importance during the Renaissance period, is often qualified as the Queen of Spices because of its very pleasant aroma and taste. The Western Ghat forest of the Malabar coast, India, is the center of origin and diversity for cardamom and it might have been nature's design that the King and Queen of spices (black pepper and cardamom) originated in the same forest.

This volume contains sixteen chapters, fourteen on cardamom and one each on large cardamom and false cardamoms. All aspects of the cardamom crop have been covered in this volume, and each chapter is written by experts in their respective fields. This volume is visualized as both a textbook and reference work for scientists and students of horticulture, plantation crops, botany and related fields, and will go on to serve as the main reference volume on cardamom for many years to come.
 

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thanku sir, the efforts you have made for this will be encourageble and immense. thanks for the great contribution to the plantation crops and the growing assosiastion.

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Page xii - No 2092/91) details the specifications for the obligatory quality controls to be carried out at all stages of production and processing of organic products. Fascinating plant folklore and ethnopharmacology leads to medicinal potential. Examples are the muscle relaxants based on the arrow poison, curare, from species of Chondrodendron, and the antimalarials derived from species of Cinchona and Artemisia. The methods of detection of pharmacological activity have become increasingly reliable and specific,...
Page xii - Some suppliers of plant raw material are now able to certify that they are supplying organically-farmed medicinal plants, herbs and spices. The Economic Union directive (CVO/EU No 2092/91) details the specifications for the obligatory quality controls to be carried out at all stages of production and processing of organic products. Fascinating plant folklore and ethnopharmacology leads to medicinal potential.
Page iii - ... of industrial importance. Edited by Dr Roland Hardman Volume 1 Valerian, edited by Peter J. Houghton Volume 2 Perilla, edited by He-ci Yu, Kenichi Kosuna and Megumi Haga Volume 3 Poppy, edited by Jeno Bernath Volume 4 Cannabis, edited by David T.
Page xiii - The methods of detection of pharmacological activity have become increasingly reliable and specific, frequently involving enzymes in bioassays and avoiding the use of laboratory animals. By using bioassay linked fractionation of crude plant juices or extracts, compounds can be specifically targeted which, for example, inhibit blood platelet aggregation, or have antitumour, or antiviral, or any other required activity. With the assistance of robotic devices, all the members of a genus may be readily...
Page xii - Drought in the country of origin has forced up prices". Natural products do not mean safe products and account of this has to be taken by the above industries, which are subject to regulation. For example, a number of plants which are approved for use in medicine must not be used in cosmetic products.
Page xiii - Medicine and this office in 1994 assisted the filing of several Investigational New Drug (IND) applications, required for clinical trials of some Chinese herbal preparations. The significance of these applications was that each Chinese preparation involved several plants and yet was handled as a single IND. A demonstration of the contribution of efficacy, of each ingredient of each plant, was not required.
Page xii - This may require absence of, or prescribed limits of, radioactive material, heavy metals, aflatoxin, pesticide residue, as well as the required level of active principle. This analytical control is costly and tends to exclude small batches of plant material. Large scale contracted mechanised cultivation with designated seed or plantlets is now preferable. Today, plant selection is not only for the yield of active principle, but for the plant's ability to overcome disease, climatic stress and the...
Page iii - Valerian, edited by Peter J. Houghton Volume 2 Perilla, edited by He-ci Yu, Kenichi Kosuna and Megumi Haga Volume 3 Poppy, edited by Jeno Bernath Volume 4 Cannabis, edited by David T. Brown Volume 5 Neem, edited by HS Puri Volume 6 Ergot, edited by Vladimir...
Page xii - The assessment of safe to use starts with the harvested plant material which has to comply with an official monograph. This may require absence of, or prescribed limits of, radioactive material, heavy metals, aflatoxin, pesticide residue, as well as the required level of active principle.
Page xii - Many industries are involved such as forestry, agriculture, chemical, food, flavour, beverage, pharmaceutical, cosmetic and fragrance. The plant raw materials are roots, rhizomes, bulbs, leaves, stems, barks, wood, flowers, fruits and seeds. These yield gums, resins, essential (volatile) oils, fixed oils, waxes, juices, extracts and spices for medicinal and aromatic purposes. All these commodities are traded world-wide. A dealer's market report for an item may say "Drought in the country of origin...

References to this book

Spices
E. V. Nybe
Limited preview - 2007

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