Care and Repair of Shop Machines: A Complete Guide to Setup, Troubleshooting, and Maintenance

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Taunton Press, 2002 - Crafts & Hobbies - 202 pages
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Woodshop tools are a major investment -- and keeping them in good running order is essential. In Care and Repair of Shop Machines, veteran woodworker John White shows you how to assemble, tune, maintain and repair the machines that you count on. Throughout the book, Whites approach is practical, straight-forward, and effective.

White includes chapters on tune-up, the jointer, the table saw, the thickness planer, the drill press, the bandsaw, the router table and the miter saw. This is the first book youll reach for when your machines arent performing, and its the book you need to keep them running at their best.

Care and Repair of Shop Machines gives you:

  • complete guidance on assembling, tuning, maintaining and repairing all major shop machines
  • low-tech solutions and alternatives to expensive set up tools and jigs
  • clear, concise troubleshooting information geared to help you solve common tool problems
  • some excellent jigs to improve tool performance
 

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Very nice write-up for table saw alignment. I didn't rear it completely but I still have some suggestions. One problem is minor but needs to be said. It is written that the miter slot needs to be in alignment with the blade. It should read that the blade needs to be in alignment with the miter slot. The blade is being aligned to the slot.
Another issue I have is in aligning the rip fence. It is written that the rip fence needs to be in alignment with the blade. I disagree with this statement. The rip fence should be in alignment with the slot used to align the blade. This is easily accomplished with a piece of "nice 1 x 2 about an inch long inserted (hopefully snug) into the miter slot one at the rear and one at the front. I like to have the grain perpendicular to the table rather than parallel. With the pieces of wood in place one only has to hold the fence to them while the bolts are tightened.
For this reason I give it 4 strs.
Other than these two issues it is a very good discussion.
 

Contents

Introduction
3
Commercial Jigs and Setup Aids
9
The Jointer
16
Cleaning and Lubricating
18
Gib TuneUp
25
Fence Alignment
36
Testing the Machine
48
Checking the Saws Drive Line
64
Troubleshooting
94
Table Adjustments
101
Aligning the Table with the Cutterhead
111
The Drill Press
120
Tuning Up a Drill Press
128
The Router Table
164
Making a Wood Table Frame
170
The Miter Saw
178

Checking for ArborFlange Runout
72
Aligning the Rip Fence
78
Checking the Miter Gauge
86
Tuning Up a Miter Saw
184
Sources
198
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

White has been a cabinetmaker for 20 years.

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