Careers in Architecture

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McGraw Hill Professional, Oct 19, 2001 - Business & Economics - 178 pages
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Ideal for college-bound students or anyone thinking about making a career change

Careers in Architecture offers all the information career seekers need to explore and choose a profession and then narrow it down to a job that suits them. The book provides an overview of architecture, outlines job options, and shows how to plan and prepare for a career.

 

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Contents

THE FIELD OF ARCHITECTURE
3
PREPARING FOR A CAREER IN ARCHITECTURE
14
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL ARCHITECTURE
29
HISTORIC PRESERVATION
40
TEACHING ARCHITECTURE
48
PART TWO RELATED FIELDS
57
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
59
ENGINEERING
74
URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING
85
CONSTRUCTION
93
MORE FIRSTHAND ACCOUNTS FROM THE FIELD
107
PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS
119
FURTHER READING
137
ACCREDITED TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR ARCHITECTURE IN THE UNITED STATES PUERTO RICO AND CANADA
139
ACCREDITED PROGRAMS IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
157
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Page 44 - National Register of Historic Places The National Register of Historic Places is the nation's official list of cultural resources worthy of preservation.
Page 73 - They work on power-producing machines such as electricity-producing generators, internal combustion engines, steam and gas turbines, and jet and rocket engines. They also...
Page 75 - In the last 2 years, most courses are in engineering, usually with a concentration in one branch. For example, the last...
Page 57 - Everyone enjoys attractively designed residential areas, public parks and playgrounds, college campuses, shopping centers, golf courses, parkways, and industrial parks. Landscape architects design these areas so that they are not only functional but beautiful and compatible with the natural environment as well. They plan the location of buildings, roads, and walkways and the arrangement of flowers, shrubs, and trees.
Page 57 - ... the best way to conserve or restore natural resources. Once these decisions are made, landscape architects create detailed plans indicating new topography, vegetation, walkways, and other landscaping details, such as fountains and decorative features. In planning a site, landscape architects first consider the nature and purpose of the project and the funds available. They analyze the natural elements of the site, such as the climate, soil, slope of the land, drainage, and vegetation...
Page 51 - Faculty members at universities normally spend a significant part of their time doing research; those in 4-year colleges, somewhat less; and those in 2-year colleges, relatively little.
Page 17 - In most schools the student's work is carefully reviewed before advancement to the next phase. Such points provide a relatively easy means of transfer into an architecture program; transfer to another institution, particularly between degrees; or transfer to another academic discipline. The logical break points may also be used by the faculty to transfer out students who have demonstrated little progress. The early segments of the curriculum mix "pre-professional...
Page 58 - ... most residential landscape design projects are too small to provide suitable income compared with larger commercial or multiunit residential projects. Some nurseries offer residential landscape design services, but these services often are performed by lesser qualified landscape designers or others with training and experience in related areas. Landscape architects who work for government agencies do similar work at national parks, government buildings, and other government-owned facilities.
Page 74 - Some employers regard them as having skills between those of a technician and an engineer. Graduate training is essential for engineering faculty positions but is not required for the majority of entry-level engineering jobs. Many engineers obtain...
Page 62 - Some are allowed to participate in the actual design of a project. However, interns must perform all work under the supervision of a licensed landscape architect. Additionally, all drawings and specifications must be signed and sealed by the licensed landscape architect, who takes legal responsibility for the work. After gaining experience and becoming licensed, landscape architects usually can carry a design through all stages of development. After several years, they may become project managers,...

About the author (2001)

Blythe Camenson is a full-time writer with more than four dozen books to her credit, most on the subject of various careers. She is also coauthor of Your Novel Proposal: From Creation to Contract and director of Fiction Writer's Connection, a membership organization for new writers.

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