Caregiving, Cultural, and Cognitive Perspectives on Secure-base Behavior and Working Models: New Growing Points of Attachment Theory and Research, Issue 244

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Everett Waters
Society for Research in Child Development, 1995 - Psychology - 336 pages
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The attachment bond that develops between infant and mother is the first of many intimate relationships we form throughout life, and as such it has been the focus of much research. But how does the quality of the secure base phenomena that defines this bond vary among individuals and across cultures? What methods can be used to asses its presence and characteristics?

Following an interview with Mary S. Ainsworth, the originator of the concept of secure base, this new Monograph brings together eleven papers that consolidate our understanding of the empirical advances that have occurred in attachment research. The collection is organized into three sections. Part One includes papers on the generalizability of attachment theory and data, including cross-cultural research. Part Two addresses both normative and individual differences among mothers, children, caregivers, and their interactions—and methods for the valid assessment of these. Part Three examines the mental representations that children use to depict their different attachment relationships. Together these papers will stimulate child development specialists and students to explore different assessment methods and to move beyond current understandings of attachment.

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Contents

PART
23
TO THE DESCRIPTION AND CLASSIFICATION
49
INTRODUCTION TO PART 3
95
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Klaus E. Grossmann (PhD, University of Arkansas, 1965; Hab., University of Freiburg, 1970) first discovered the work of John Bowlby and Mary Ainsworth while conducting ethological and experimental research at the University of Freiburg's Institute for Biology after receiving his doctoral degree. He was appointed Full Professor at Bielefeld University, Germany, in 1970, and began the Bielefeld Longitudinal Study in 1973. In 1977, he moved his laboratory to the University of Regensburg and started a second long-term longitudinal attachment study. Professor Grossmann's numerous publications include, most recently, a collection of John Bowlby's and Mary Ainsworth's key papers in German translation with commentary (coedited with Karin Grossmann).
Karin Grossmann (PhD, University of Regensburg, 1984) is a Senior Scientist in Psychology at the University of Regensburg, Germany. Dr. Grossmann's research focuses on longitudinal and cross-cultural research in attachment. Widely published, she recently coauthored (with Klaus Grossmann) a book based on the Bielefeld and Regensburg longitudinal studies. She also teaches and publishes on the applications of attachment theory and research in family matters.
Everett Waters (PhD, University of Minnesota, 1977) is Professor of Psychology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and a founding member of the New York Attachment Consortium. At the University of Minnesota's Institute of Child Development, Dr. Waters studied ethology and evolution with William Charlesworth and the concept of development and emotional development with L. Alan Sroufe. His extensive publications include the classic volume Patterns of Attachment (coauthored withMary Ainsworth and colleagues) and two Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development.

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