Caring and Compassion in Clinical Practice: Issues in the Selection, Training, and Behavior of Helping Professionals

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Rowman & Littlefield, 1985 - Psychology - 214 pages
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Although no conscientious practitioner in a helping profession wishes to be regarded as insensitive, too frequently such professionals treat their patients more like illnesses or problems than persons in distress. Seymour Sarason shows that such treatment derives not from intent, but from the ways helping professionals are chosen, schooled, and supervised--and from the institutional policies they are expected to carry out. Sarason aptly suggests how to improve the care that is rendered.
 

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Contents

Introduction to Issues and Problems
1
Scope of the Problem Relation of Institutional Context and Clinician Behavior
12
Training of Physicians The Unintended Impact of the Flexner Report on Medical Education
38
Inadequacies in the Training of Teachers and Lawyers
62
Examples of Uncaring Behavior
87
Psychiatry The Caring and Compassionate Profession?
105
Clinical Psychology New Profession Old Answers
132
Behind and Beyond Labels
158
The Process of Understanding The Relevance of Stanislavski for the Clinician
186
References
205
Index
211
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About the author (1985)

SEYMOUR B. SARASON is professor emeritus of psychology in the Department of Psychology and at the Institute for Social and Policy Studies at Yale University. He is the author of numerous books, including The Case for Change (Jossey-Bass, 1993), The Predictable Failure of Educational Reform (Jossey-Bass, 1990), Schooling in America: Scapegoat and Salvation (1983), and The Culture of the School and the Problem of Change (2nd ed., 1982).

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