Caring and Gender

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2000 - Political Science - 183 pages
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Are women naturally better caregivers than men? Can paid care in an institutuion be good care? Can voluntary community care replace government welfare? Is the caring family disappearing? What role should government play in supporting or regulating families? Is day care for children as good as home care? Using engaging case studies and research findings, this lively new book from the Gender Lens Series explores these and other questions and controversies, challenging the notion that caregiving is a "natural" pattern and demonstrating how it is thoroughly social. Written in an inviting and readable style, the authors address complex issues about caring, making them accessible to undergraduate students and lay people. The book shows those who will enter diverse caregiving professions how to see their particular occupation as influenced by the larger society and broader social relations of caring. It also shows how beliefs about gender and family shape caregiving, and how caregiving affects gender inequality.
 

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Contents

Caring and Gender
xv
What Is Caring?
xvi
Why Study Caring and Gender?
1
Natural or Social?
3
The Devaluation of Caregiving
7
Caregiving and Inequality
8
Plan of the Book
9
Historical Glimpses
11
The Example of Nursing Homes
74
Separate Gendered Spheres and the Devaluation of Caring
85
Case Studies of Good Paid Care
89
The Care Receivers Power
96
Governing Care
99
Gender Care and Welfare in the United States
103
Government and Caregiving in Other Industrial Countries
112
The Threat of Big Brother
119

Colonial Contrasts
12
Work and Care Become Separate Spheres
19
Caregiving Becomes a Profession
25
Conclusion
33
Caring in Families
35
Families That Are Not SelfSufficient
37
Parental Care for Children
43
Caring in Couples
56
Conflicts Between Paid Work and Family Caring
60
Family Care for People Who Are Chronically III or Severely Disabled
63
Conclusion
67
Paid Caregiving
69
Devaluing Caring ProfitMaking Bureaucracy and Hierarchy
70
Paid Care Can Be Good Care
72
How Can Government Both Support Caregiving and Promote Gender Equality?
125
Conclusion
131
Caregiving in Communities
133
What is Community Care?
134
What Are the Benefits of Care in Communities?
135
What Are the Limits of Caregiving in Communities?
139
Conclusion
146
The Future of Caregiving
147
Explaining Gendered Caring and Gender Inequality
148
Paths to Expanding Care and Gender Equality
150
Notes and References
159
INDEX
176
About the Authors
181
Copyright

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