Caring for Patients: A Critique of the Medical Model

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Stanford University Press, Jul 1, 1997 - Medical - 420 pages
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"See your patient as a person, not a disease." This is the essential message of an experienced and compassionate physician who questions the prevailing medical model of patient care - that every illness has a physical cause that can be identified and treated medically - and who argues for the necessity of taking the psychological and social circumstances of the patient into account in the process of diagnosis and treatment.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Limitations of the Medical Model
9
What This Patient Needs Is a Doctor
31
The Concept of Disease
45
The Functional Disorders
58
The Concept of Care Determines
67
Who Is This
73
Diagnostic Strategies for Unrecognized Personal Illness
81
Barriers to PersonCentered Care
151
Illness
163
Emotional Behavior in Animals 164 Emotional Behavior in
176
Differential Diagnosis
204
The Medical History
257
Misunderstandings and Hidden Issues
278
The Personal Interview
301
Engaging the Patient
327

Health Practices Psychosocial Distress
96
The Medical Model in Perspective
112
Is Feeling Depressed a Disease?
135

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Page 384 - Krol PA. Childhood sexual and physical abuse as factors in adult psychiatric illness.

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About the author (1997)

The late Allen Barbour, M.D., was Professor of Clinical Medicine at Stanford University. He served as Chief of the Stanford Diagnostic Clinic at the Stanford Medical School from 1971 until his retirement in 1981. During his tenure, he received six awards for outstanding clinical teaching.

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