Carnegie Institution of Washington Publication, Issue 236

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Carnegie Institution of Washington, 1915 - Science
 

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Page 75 - There is in the germplasm a factor, E, which induces the more or less periodic occurrence of an excited condition (or an exceptionally strong reactibility to exciting presentations) and its absence, e, which results in an absence of extreme excitability. There are also the factor, C, which makes for normal cheerfulness of mood, and its absence, c, which permits a more or less periodic depression. Moreover, these factors behave as though in different chromosomes, so that they are inherited independently...
Page 116 - A gentleman, well to do in the world, but with a slight hereditary tendency to insanity, killed himself in the thirtyfifth year of his age by cutting his throat while in a warm bath. No cause could be assigned for the act. He had two sons and a daughter — all under age at the time of his death. The family separated, the daughter marrying. On arriving at the age of thirty-five, the eldest son cut his throat while in a warm bath, but was rescued ere life was extinct. At about the same age the second...
Page 117 - Subsequently, at the age of 30, he made a similar unsuccessful attempt, but was again saved. A year afterward he was found in his bath by his servant, with his throat cut from ear to ear.
Page 73 - I don't know as I am fit for anything, and I have thought that I could wish to die young, and let the remembrance of me and my faults perish in the grave, rather than live, as I fear I do, a trouble to every one.
Page 117 - ... insanity, killed himself in the thirtyfifth year of his age by cutting his throat while in a warm bath. No cause could be assigned for the act. He had two sons and a daughter — all under age at the time of his death. The family separated, the daughter marrying. On arriving at the age of thirty-five, the eldest son cut his throat while in a warm bath, but was rescued ere life was extinct. At about the same age the second son succeeded in killing himself in the same way. The daughter, in her...
Page 75 - There was no selection of these family histories because it was foreseen that they would supply facts fitting the hypothesis, and no rejections of any histories because they afforded statements opposed to the hypothesis. In these 89 family histories were found 146 matings that could be used because the mated pair, their parents (usually), and certain of their offspring were sufficiently described for the purposes of the test. Let us consider, first, the case where a person of pure, excitable strain...
Page 122 - Finally the study throws light upon the 'springs of conduct.' Just what we shall, in any situation, do is determined by numerous factors, but the general nature of our reactions, whether violent or repressed — this is determined by the hereditary nature of our temperaments. The romantic and the classic type of reacting, the hyperkinetic and the hypokinetic, the radical and the conservative, the feebly inhibited and the strongly inhibited constitute a dualism that runs through our whole population....
Page 124 - On the Association of Various Hyperkinetic Symptoms with Partial Lesions of the Optic Thalamus.
Page 25 - These cases differ from those described in the last paragraph only in this, that the inhibitory mechanism is so poorly developed that the nomadic tendency shows itself without waiting, as it were, for the paralysis of the inhibitions.
Page 11 - They have no ethical principles and they do not recognize the obligations of the Ten Commandments. There is extreme moral laxity in the relation of the two sexes, and on the whole they take life easily, and are complete fatalists. At the same time they are great cowards, and they play the rôle of the fool or the jester in the popular anecdotes of eastern Europe.

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